In the mid-season/summer finale, Jessica leaves Pearson Specter Litt, and Gina Torres leaves the show! Also, Louis proposes to a pregnant Tara, and OMG, Harvey and Donna end the episode holding hands, in what seems like a platonic way.

Though do platonic friends often hold hands? Not really. Not unless they’re in a rom-com about two best friends who are actually in love but one or both of them hasn’t figured that out yet. So maybe Harvey and Donna shippers do have reason to rejoice. Maybe.


Jessica has made Leonard Bailey’s appeal her #1 priority, because when she was an awkward teen with un-straightened hair and her workaholic doctor father never had time for his wife or daughter, she wanted to become a lawyer, and not the ‘power-hungry bottom-feeding’ kind, but the kind that helps people.

So when Robert Zane warns her that the company her number one client Jim Reynolds works for is shopping around for a new law firm, she makes Harvey and Louis handle that situation, because she has a death row case to fight, damn it.

In court, she slays Georgina, Bailey’s former defender. One for Jessica. She agrees to have Bailey testify about what happened the day of the murders, which is that he and his alibi witness, both of them high on meth, came upon a dying, bleeding girl on the street and he stayed with her until the police came and accused him of killing her and her already dead boyfriend.


Jessica lets Rachel question Bailey before the jury and  he comes across as sympathetic. And when Mike and Rachel suggest that Jessica let the victim’s father incriminate himself on the stand (taking  a page from the movie A Few Good Men) – with regard to him paying off the alibi witness to go away and not testify before she conveniently died – she goes for it. The gamble works – Bailey is exonerated and released on the spot.

After a verdict like that, Jessica can’t even anymore with the PSL travails. She turns down Robert Zane’s offer to merge firms, as generous and kind-hearted as it is. She’s going to move to Chicago instead with old flame Jeff and fight injustice, an idea Jeff appears to be in full support of, though since when is hitching your limo to the wagon of some guy you went out with for a few months a year ago a good idea for a smart, powerful woman? Never mind. Jessica gets a bittersweet ending and an au revoir.


When she breaks the news to Harvey and Louis, Louis freaks out but Donna, the Voice of Reason, points out that Gina Torres has been released from her contract because she can’t stand living in Toronto for half the year and is moving to Shondaland in L.A. instead, so there’s nothing the other principals can do except continue to endure Toronto life, and console themselves by instagramming idyllic photos of summer weekends spent at Patrick J. Adams’ family cottage in Muskoka.



With Jessica preoccupied with the Bailey case, Harvey and Louis work as an uneasy team to save what’s left of the firm. When they hear clients are bailing because Sutter is spreading the word that Harvey ‘tanked’ his defence, Harvey goes to Sutter’s house and threatens to have it seized under the bankruptcy proceedings unless the rumours stop. To avoid losing number one client Jim Reynolds, Harvey and Louis enlist Trader Stu’s help one last time and get him to buy out a major portion of the company Reynolds works for, so they can keep Reynolds in charge and fight off the PSL-hating Board of Directors. Trader Stu and his suspenders are also leaving, though – his motley crew of traders was offered free use of Sutter’s former offices in the bankruptcy settlement. So, goodbye, Stu.


There’s no goodbye for Louis & Tara, more like a hello baby, because Tara is pregnant, with her ex’s child, and Louis is fine with that, he doesn’t even need to sleep on it, not really, though these two know each other even less well than Jessica and Jeff. Never mind again – Louis proposes and Tara accepts, because they’re both crazy. And it looks like Carly Pope is staying with the show for a little longer.


Speaking of weddings, Rachel and Mike do not discuss when theirs might happen, though Mike gives Rachel a picture of her being a boss in court, because she’s well on her way to big-time lawyer-dom, while Mike’s future is up in the air.


When he and Harvey sit down in their open neck shirts to drink scotch and celebrate Mike’s release from jail, Harvey offers Mike a consultant job at the firm. Mike is grateful, but he doesn’t know if he wants that – he’ll think about it during the hiatus.

And did I mention that with Jessica gone, the office empty again, and the future not looking too bright, that Harvey and Donna hold hands, gaze out the window together at the photo backdrop of New York at night and look hopeful? Yeah, I think I did.


Suits will return in the winter of 2017 to finish the 6th season, and so will I.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

In which Mike gets out of jail, for real and for good! Yes, there were many machinations and reversals and ‘the deal is off’ declarations in this hour, but still – Mike’s release came earlier than I expected. And speaking of completely wrong predictions, Louis’s romantic rival Joshua was not only not played by Rick Hoffman or Gabriel Macht, as I suggested he should be, but the Joshua character did not even appear. Joke’s on me.


There are two story threads that affect the timing of Mike getting out of prison. One has to do with Cahill’s seizure of Jill and Kevin’s assets, including those acquired before Jill started committing financial crimes. To combat this, Mike threatens to sue Cahill on Kevin’s behalf for abuse of power, though he won’t file the suit if Cahill gets Kevin released. Cahill is initially outraged by this threat. He barks at both Mike and Harvey about the very idea, abd even mutters the word ‘fucking’ at one point (shocker) but he later helps Mike get Kevin out another way.

The other story thread that affects Mike’s release is Gallo’s. For Mike’s sake, and because he said he would, Harvey swallows his conscience and integrity and represents Gallo at a parole hearing, before which he coaches Gallo to express remorse over his past behaviour, and makes him promise to still protect Mike as long as he’s inside.

Cameron Dennis, Harvey’s former mentor and tormentor from the D.A.’s office, the guy who never saw a criminal he didn’t want to punish, by hook or by crook, and who worked with Harvey to put Gallo away originally, shows up at the hearing. He doesn’t want Gallo to go free, not even after Harvey explains why he’s doing what he’s doing.

Harvey’s conflict over what to do is not helped by Donna reminding him that Gallo is a very bad guy. She reminds Harvey of this while wearing a so not right for the office, yet so amusing (black and white cookie) dress, which wornontv.net informs me is by the designer Roland Mouret, costs US$2,470 and is currently sold out. And yes, the black panel is supposed to be on the diagonal like that.


The day that Harvey is set to perjure himself before the parole board and testify that Gallo is not a menace to society, Mike rescues him by offering himself to Dennis as a witness for the (kind of) prosecution. He truthfully reports all of Gallo’s recent evil prison doings at  the hearing, and parole is denied. Bonus: he made a deal with Dennis to have Kevin released in return for his testimony.

That night, Kevin is released, but Mike has secretly arranged with Cahill to stay in jail one more night, alone in his cell – dum da dum dum. Gallo comes to the cell after hours, swearing vengeance, and pulls out a shiv. But Mike has set up a video camera in the room to record the incident, and asked the one honest guard in the joint to watch the footage and break into the cell after Gallo tries to knife him, but before any actual stabbing happens.


Harvey gloats when he informs Gallo after this incident that he now has two options:1) to return to maximum security prison, where everyone knows he is an informant, so he will be either killed or made to suffer mightily (my words), or 2) stay at Danbury for 5 more years, but without arranging any kind of harm to Mike, Harvey, or their loved ones on the outside, because if he does, back to Rikers (or equivalent) he goes. Gallo picks  option 2, and I can only hope that  Suits will have ended its run before he gets out of jail.


Louis’s screen time this week is confined to stressing about and solving his love life issues with Tara and her unseen long distance boyfriend Joshua, who has come to town for deep talks. Louis and Donna discuss his worries during a joint mudding session, during which Donna appears in a white bikini top which exposes more details of her anatomy than I feel comfortable knowing, and they discuss it at the office too.


The Joshua problem is resolved by episode’s end when Tara, whose hair and makeup have noticeably improved since she became a semi-recurring character, tells Louis that Joshua up and proposed to her, the cheeky unseen guy, but wonder of wonders, she wants Louis instead.


Jessica, not to be outdone by Donna when it comes to wacky, impractical, designer-wear office getups, wears this Givenchy blouse/top/what? to speak to Harvey about his Mike/Gallo problems, but spends the rest of her time working on the Bailey case.

Rachel has found a precedent for re-opening the case that involves accusing Bailey’s  former lawyer, a woman named Georgina who has moved into corporate practice from criminal law, of having provided inadequate representation for Bailey, because she didn’t introduce the alibi witness’s testimony into the case 12 years ago.


Jessica “drops the hammer” on this Georgina, and convinces her to sign an affidavit saying she heard the alibi and didn’t use it. A judge reopens the case, which means that a male prosecutor starts trying to make deals with Jessica to avoid a re-trial. Deals like 7 more years for Bailey and then he can go free. Jessica thinks Bailey should take the deal, but Rachel thinks they should fight, which she admits to Bailey when he presses her. Bailey also wants a chance to be proven innocent, because there’s no point in living, according to him, if the world and his family think he’s guilty. He accuses Jessica of being heartless and uncaring (this again), prompting her to prove she does care by reuniting Bailey with his teenage daughter. Hugs all around.

Penultimate episode end questions:

  • What happened to Julius, the prison counselor? Will we ever see him again? How about the prison? That big set, the recurring guard characters – are they all gone? And what about Stu Dickhead? One can only hope he and his suspenders are on permanent hiatus. Probably not, though.
  • Can Mike and Rachel get married now? I guess not – she has to get her law degree first, right? No wedding for us!
  • All the principal characters this season have had at least a semblance of a personal love life (even if it was only referred to, and not shown, ahem,  Donna) except for Harvey. He’s about due to enter the dating scene again.

Next week, on the summer season finale, it’s all law firm business, all the time.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

In which deals are on and off and off and on, and I’m sorry to say that the plot reversals have come to feel more like time fillers than organic, inevitable outcomes of a well developed story.

jill in prison

The end result of the incessant back and forths on who will inform on whom is that Mike convinces Kevin’s wife Jill to testify against her father in exchange for full immunity. That’s after we learn that Jill only agreed to the insider trading scheme to begin with because she found out Sutter’s fund was a big Ponzi scheme and she hoped they could make some quick gains to square things with their investors. In other words, William Sutter is the worst, and Jill and Kevin are collateral damage to his horribleness. Also, Harvey played Jill a recording of Sutter saying it would be better for Jill to go to jail than for him to, and Donna approached Jill on the street, and redheads should stick together, and since Donna’s dad was also a criminal, her advice is to get out now.

j in pink

Harvey starts the episode with Jessica, in a fetching shade of pink and a very tight skirt, commanding him to win Sutter’s case (for the sake of the law firm) since Mike’s deal was called off anyway. Harvey gives Sutter’s defence a good go for a bit, blows off Cahill, and discredits a key prosecution witness in a deposition, but he ends the ep by persuading Sutter to plead guilty and make his own deal for a reduced sentence.

Mike and Kevin (or, as Gallo amusingly calls them, while channeling my mother –  Frick and Frack) start off this week by making up, but when Mike comes clean about informing on him, Kevin beats him up in the kitchen. Later, after Jill agrees to testify against her father, Mike and Kevin make up again. Since Mike cut a new deal with Cahill in exchange for delivering Jill, it looks like he’s going to get out of prison. It looks like it enough that he tells Rachel he’s coming home, and Donna and Rachel go out to celebrate his release. But he’s not out yet. Not with two more episodes still to come before the show goes on its mid-season hiatus. He’d better be out by then, though. Or I will be doing a lot of sad head shaking and disappointed finger wagging.

kev & mike make up

And what about Gallo, you ask? Gallo pressures Mike to pressure Harvey to get moving on that motion to have Gallo paroled. Harvey admits he hasn’t done anything about it yet because he thought that if Mike got out, Gallo should stay in. Mike urges Harvey to get to it, and convinces  Gallo to use his influence with the guards to get Kevin out of solitary after the kitchen fight. Gallo delivers but warns Mike that violent retribution will ensue,  inside or outside of jail, if Mike double crosses him. So we’ve got that to look forward to.

rachel & aunt

This episode was directed by Gabriel Macht, BTW, so I have him to thank for making my screengrabs easier to grab by occasionally using shots that show two characters facing each other in the same frame. Thank you, Gabriel!  Anyway, Rachel & Jessica tell Leonard Bailey his alibi witness is dead, but there is another way to delay his execution – if he can come up with, say, a relative who would attend the execution but can’t for 60 days because she’s not well. Amazingly, Bailey has such a relative! – the aunt who raised him but thinks he is guilty and has not seen or spoken to him in years. Rachel pays the woman a visit. The aunt has no intention of witnessing the execution, but when Rachel implores her to sign an affidavit saying she would like the execution to be delayed, she does.

When Bailey hears about this, he gets all pissed that Rachel didn’t make his aunt care about him, as if that’s more important than whether he lives or dies, and he accuses Jessica of being cold and heartless. Afterwards, Rachel tries to be sympathetic to Jessica, but Jessica is like, just go find some evidence to clear the SOB, will ya? And late at night in the law firm library, it looks like Rachel might have found something she can use in the case …

donna in full skirt dress

Louis confides in Donna, wearing a kicky full-skirted dress that is a flattering departure from her usual flattering dress styles, that he doesn’t know if he can be the Other Man with Tara. Donna mentions that she broke up with the never-seen-and-only-recently-talked-about Mitchell person she claims to have been dating because he wanted to move in with her, and she knew he wasn’t the One. But Tara does seem like the One for Louis, so he should keep trying. And why are all the Suits scenes lit so darkly, even daytime office scenes?


On a dinner date with Tara, Louis makes a scene with the maitre d’ that is all about Louis’s inability to share her with anyone. Tara is inexplicably charmed by this outburst, and they go home and have what Tara calls ‘magical’ sex, after which Director Gabriel treats us to this rather frightening if comical aerial shot of the lovebirds. Louis thinks his yeoman sex work means Tara will now break up with her other guy, whose name is Josh.  Except Tara is not ready to do that, and Josh is coming to town soon.

What do you think – will this Josh be way better looking and charming than Louis, and play on all his insecurities, or will he be Rick Hoffman, playing a dual role? That would be kind of funny, actually. Or maybe Josh could be Gabriel Macht playing a dual role. That would be even funnier.

jessica and jeff

While in court making a motion on Bailey’s case, Jessica runs into her old flame Jeff Malone. Jeff has softened somewhat since leaving the law firm and their relationship in a major huff. Jessica says she hasn’t called him because she’s still embroiled in all her law firm’s shit but she cares about him. They go for dinner, and Jeff says he loves her for herself, cold heartlessness and all. Awww. She invites him to spend the night, but he wants to go slow. That is, he’s looking for a job reference from her, because he’s moving to Chicago. She gives him a good one, and he leaves, though not for good, if I know this show.

Next week: Cahill tells Mike his deal to get out of prison is off (again). Sigh.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

In which arbitrary, rapidly approaching deadlines are imposed for purposes of story tension, Jessica and Rachel wear great hair to wage legal battle, Donna mentions in passing that she just broke up with someone she’s been dating for the last two months (say what now? she has a life outside of the office?), Louis goes on a date, and Stu Douchebag is renamed Stu Dickface.

court hair

Save the date #1: Rachel & Jessica tell Leonard his execution has been set for 30 days hence. He is understandably upset by this news, so Rachel & Jessica and their great hair go to court to ask for a delay and are given Save the Date #2: a week in which to find Maria Gomez, Bailey’s alibi witness. They also collect dirty looks from the families of the murder victims who were two 16-year-olds, ugh.

R&J Commerce CourtOn their way out of Commerce Court, a large office complex in Toronto’s financial district that houses banks, law firms, and accounting firms, but no New York state courtrooms that I know of, Jessica gives Rachel contact info for her personal investigator, someone named Carter. The offscreen Carter discovers that Maria changed her name to evade an abusive husband, and the court records on her new identity are sealed. Rachel’s dad has a connection that can access the sealed info, so she asks him to do her a favour, lawyer to lawyer, and she will owe him.

Zane Sr. find outs Maria is dead, so there goes the alibi. A distraught father of one of the murdered teens accosts Rachel in the law firm lobby at the end of a day, and gives her hell about defending the already convicted murderer who killed his daughter. Gretchen steps in to support Rachel and scare the guy off, and Jessica later returns to the office to commiserate with Rachel, in her steely way.

louis & donna

Louis spends most of his screen time stressing about his upcoming dinner date with Tara the architect. He wants it to be extra special, but Donna suggests instead an intimate restaurant. Tara deems the setting perfect before she confesses that she already has a long-distance boyfriend with whom she has an understanding that they can see other people, so is Louis cool with her dating them both simultaneously? Okay, then. And Lo&Do say I-love-you to each other, but only platonically.

mike & kevin

Mike & Kevin: these two, and their on-again off-again bromance, honestly. They’re breaking up already and they didn’t even get to honeymoon. This week, Mike finds out the reason Kevin won’t turn on Sutter is because Sutter is paying him to keep quiet (and because he wants to protect his wife Jill from prosecution). Mike enlists Donna to help him lure Jill in to the prison so he can urge her to turn on her dad. Jill won’t do that, and when she tells Kevin she met Mike, Kevin threatens to beat Mike up if he keeps interfering with his business.

A remorseful Mike asks Harvey if Kevin and Jill can be included in the going free deal (they can’t) and tries to make up with Kevin, but too late – Kevin has put in for a transfer to another cell.


Remember Gallo, Mr. Prison Powderkeg? He becomes suspicious of how often Harvey visits Mike without stopping in to see Gallo about his release. After guessing correctly that Mike is trying to use Kevin as a way out, he threatens to reveal this secret unless Harvey gets him released, and soon.

I have become bored confused by the collusion, deception, real or is it fake? defense stuff that’s going on with Harvey, Cahill, and their joint nemesis Sutter. But I will try to summarize what I think went on this time:

Cahill staves off dismissal of Sutter’s case by saying he has obtained Sutter’s trading software program as evidence (secretly given to him by Harvey). The judge warns that if she finds out Cahill acquired the program illegally, there goes the case AND she will charge Cahill with malicious prosecution. She then announces Save the Date #3: the trial will begin in 5 days.

Harvey asks Louis for help in analyzing the big trades Sutter’s company made, which means Louis asks Donna to ask Stu Dickface for access to his database, which means Donna towers over him (like Jessica did), announces that she is Donna and she is awesome, and proves it by sinking a shaky shot in a kids’ basketball net.

Donna & Stu

donna's shotStu sees the Donna light, gives Louis access, and gifts him with new Litt Up mugs besides. Louis discovers the common link in the trades is a consulting investment bank, and someone named Philip Allen is identified as the banker who gave Sutter insider trading info. Offscreen, Cahill makes a deal with Allen to testify against Sutter. Because Harvey, thanks to Louis and Stu, led Cahill to Allen, the free Mike deal still stands, so Harvey makes this happy face:harvey happyUntil Cahill and his bosses nix the deal, and Harvey makes this sad/angry face:harvey sadder

Next week, the gloves are off! The match-ups: Harvey vs. Cahill, Mike vs. Kevin and Gallo.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

In which Donna and Jessica break out some (more) beautiful day dresses, we’re subjected to painful double entendres about Louis’s ‘wood’ and we’re expected to believe that Mike’s cellmate,  Kevin Wiseguy Miller, is a software developer.

better dream

Mike dreams that Harvey tells him Kevin murdered Rachel. Mike dreams this because he’s big-time cold-shouldering Kevin since hearing Kevin is in prison for drunk driving, even though the person Kevin hit had a full recovery. Unlike Mike’s parents, who died in a drunk driving crash also known as the defining event of Mike’s character forever, because this is TV land, where Harvey has lifelong abandonment issues and can’t abide women who cheat because his mother cheated and left.

Harvey had psychotherapy for his problems, so Mike asks Counselor Julius for therapy to help him get over hating Kevin long enough to make him inform on Sutter. Julius warns Mike that all actions have consequences (this season’s theme?). When Mike calls him out as a know-nothing, Julius confesses to his own criminal past.

Harvey finally learns from Cahill what secrets Kevin has to spill, and they concern the proprietary trading algorithm developed by Kevin (hahaha) which governs Sutter’s trades. Cahill wants Kevin to reveal whether the trading software dictates Sutter’s investment returns, or is insider trading going on. Sutter, meanwhile, tells Harvey the software is only one factor in his success, the other is Sutter’s  gut instinct and savant-like knowledge of the markets.

harvey national club

Harvey gets the judge to deny Cahill’s request for the software to be handed over, which makes Sutter command Harvey to move for dismissal. Harvey doesn’t want that, so he meets Cahill outside Toronto’s old, established downtown National Club (standing in for Cahill’s apartment building, I suppose), and tries to surreptitiously pass him the trading software program. Sean insists he won’t risk his career by taking evidence that comes from collusion, but by episode’s end, with the dismissal looming, he asks for the program. Turns out this case is personal – his mom, a humble schoolteacher, always dreamed of going on a trip to Spain when she retired. Too bad her teacher’s pension was lost when she invested it with that Madoff-like Sutter guy, and then she died. Cue the violins.

Harvey and Mike conduct some practice depositions in jail with Kevin and Sutter to stir up the pot, which leads to Kevin and Sutter having a yell off. It’s not until Kevin and Mike are alone in their cell that Kevin admits the trading program is bullshit, and Sutter is guilty – of insider trading and of being a terrible father-in-law. What’s worse is that Kevin’s wife was in on it. Mike brightly suggests that Kevin get back at Sutter by turning on him, and ask for immunity for the wife as part of the deal. Kevin does not agree, and makes Mike promise not to tell anyone what he now knows. Mike gives his word.

jess&rachWhile wearing a serious and flattering ‘fit and flare’ style grey wool dress, Jessica gives Rachel a big ‘not now’ on the Leonard Bailey case. Instead, Rachel convinces her prof, who admires her ‘gumption’ – and I  really hope that’s all he admires about her – to review her  motion for appeal. He suggests she dig deeper into the case and find some undeniable evidence.

Rachel finds out the public defender in Bailey’s original trial never introduced into court an alibi supplied by his friend Maria for his whereabouts at the time of the killings . Turns out Maria was high on meth at the time of the killing, and so was Bailey, a fact he had omitted to mention. Rachel gives Bailey shit for not telling her everything, but she still wants to save him, so when his execution date is set, she makes Jessica help her fight it.

Screen Shot 2016-08-23 at 11.33.36 PM.png

Jessica’s one goal in life is to increase the law firm’s billings and number of clients, so she decides to go after Sutter’s investment business (which he had promised to give only if Harvey gets him off on the criminal charges) on her own. She buttonholes Sutter at Aria restaurant, across from Toronto’s Air Canada Centre (check the Raptors’ We The North banner hanging in the ACC back there) to pitch/blackmail him into giving her the business now. Harvey is not pleased with this move on her part, since things are getting complicated with Sutter, what with defending him while helping Cahill make his case against him and all, but Jessica doesn’t give a shit about that.

donna in white

Louis & Donna – or as I called them in my notes about this episode, Lo & Do – get the comedy scenes this week, all to do with the Hamptons house Louis wanted to buy in order to woo Tara the architect.

donna pink

Donna, wearing a gorgeous Thierry Mugler white dress in one scene and a pretty pink Alexander McQueen one in another – her salary really is high – helps him buy the house. When Louis wants to show it to Tara before it’s actually in his possession, Donna helps make that happen by sending the owners away and staging the place with photos of Louis’s dead cats, etc.


Their plan backfires when the owners come home early. Tara finds out that Louis orchestrated this elaborate deception so he could spend more time with her, but instead of finding that loathsome, she declares it the most romantic thing ever. She might not think that if she’d had to listen to the series of ‘dirty’ wood-related remarks that Louis inadvertently made earlier to Donna, who made faces like she found them amusing, when, come on now – ebony? Or maybe Tara would laugh appreciatively at Louis’s buffoonish tendencies, because so far, she’s being written as his soulmate.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

In which Harvey becomes everyone’s attorney, Jessica helps Rachel not give up on fighting injustice, and people lie like mad to get other people to trust them.

potato chip

I blanked out from boredom with legal matters during some conversations between Sean Cahill and Harvey about the smoking gun deal, but I think what’s happening is this:

Mike’s prison cellmate Kevin Miller is the son-in-law of William Sutter, the investment fund guy who is soon to be indicted by Cahill. Harvey thinks Sutter is a dirty criminal, which is why he refused to represent him when Sutter asked a few weeks ago. However, Sutter craftily got Kevin to protect Mike in jail as a way to make Harvey owe him.

Cahill’s deal is still in place to have Mike freed if he can get Kevin to cough up some damning info that will ensure Sutter’s conviction. But for reasons I didn’t quite follow, that plan will only work if Harvey represents both Sutter and Kevin, and defends them to the best of his ability while secretly hoping Mike finds out something from Kevin that will convict Sutter. Otherwise, it will look like Harvey and Cahill colluded, though they’re not colluding! To make the complicated plan more credible, Harvey tells Kevin not to trust anyone in prison, including Mike.


Kevin gets suspicious when he finds out Mike wasn’t in the infirmary the night he got sprung by Harvey to go see Rachel. To allay those suspicions, Mike arranges via Julius the prison counselor to be put in solitary for a night where he meets the warden, who warns him in passing that informing doesn’t always go so well for the informant. The warden then fake-threatens Kevin, so that Kevin will think Mike is trustworthy again.

This ploy makes Kevin open up enough to finally tell Mike why he is in prison (though why couldn’t Harvey or Cahill just tell Mike this?) which is for drunk driving that almost killed someone. Sharp-minded Mike sees immediately that Kevin’s story doesn’t add up – he asks what Kevin was fighting about with his wife before he drove drunk, and why must he keep quiet about his crime to protect his family, but Kevin has confided enough for one day.

harvey & gallo

On the Gallo threat front, Mike’s attempt to file a motion to get Gallo paroled didn’t work, it has to be done in person by an attorney of record (which Mike would totally have known, come on now), so Harvey has to represent Gallo too. A rather swaggery-of-late Harvey tells Gallo he’ll help him out if Gallo protects Mike in jail, and if he doesn’t want to do that, Harvey will claim Gallo poisoned Mike and have him charged with that crime. Gallo’s not happy, but has no choice but to agree. That’s 3 new criminal clients Harvey has picked up in a week, and at least one of them will pay the firm some legal fees, hurray.

donna & louis

In lighter news, Louis asks Donna to find him a Hamptons house to buy ASAP so he can get Tara the comely architect to remodel it for him. Donna suggests, reasonably, that Louis not lie about having a house, and ask Tara out instead. But he can’t do that, because he is a sad sack, lonely heart fuckup. He is also impatient, and when Donna doesn’t find him a house right away, he gets mad, and she gets mad back. She tells him he can’t ask for her help and advice then ignore it, and he admits how much he misses having her work for him.  All is well when she finds what appears to be a perfect-for-his-needs Hamptons house and and makes an offer for it on his behalf (!) because Presumption is her middle name.

rachel & jess

The professor who got Rachel involved in the Innocence Project says Leonard Bailey’s case doesn’t qualify after all because there is no new DNA evidence, so the 3 solid reasons Rachel came up with for an appeal don’t matter. The prof offers to find Rachel a new case, but she wants to work on this one, and turn that frown on Bailey’s mighty disappointed so-now-I-get-to-die? face upside-down She asks Jessica if the firm could do it pro bono, she’d only need one hour of supervision a week. Jessica says no at first because she’s too busy trying to get the firm back on top. Later, after a discouraging day of trying and failing to find new clients (should have tried the prison, Jessica!), the two women have a sleeveless shootout in the hallway of their office building, and Jessica agrees to help out.

jessica stu.png

Somewhere in there, Harvey needed loose-ethics Stu and his merry band of traders to take on Sutter’s two billion dollar investment fund as a subsidiary company (yeah, right) in order to bypass the punitive move that Cahill slapped Sutter with of suspending his company’s trading license. Louis and Jessica pitch in on this endeavour by Louis coming up with the subsidiary idea, and Jessicca making Stu agree to it.  Go, team!


I’ll close with props (heh) to Neal McDonough, the Irish-named actor who plays the Irish-named Sean Cahill character, for his way with actual props on the Suits sets. In the last few episodes, he has managed to handle all of a baseball, a basketball, and an LP in Harvey’s office, and had fun with a sandwich and some potato chips in his own. Here he enjoys a scotch in Harvey’s office, after they decide they make a good couple of adversaries/allies who are totally not colluding.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

In which the annoying Stu Douchebag  character gets more screen time than he deserves, Louis gets a new love interest in Canada’s own Carly Pope, Harvey gets to labour under a contrived 2 day deadline, and Mike and Rachel get to have sex.


Mike is having a cozy chat in his cell with his bestie Kevin about Kevin’s young kids, when he gets called away to see Harvey, making a late night emergency jail visit to tell him about Cahill’s Who Wants To Be An Stoolie deal.

But Mike doesn’t want to make Kevin inform on his father-in-law! Even without knowing what crimes Kevin or his father-in-law have committed. He tells Harvey no, and lies to Kevin about why Harvey came by, says it was to tell him Gallo can’t be transferred out. Harvey lies in turn to Cahill that there’s no deal unless it’s in writing, but Cahill sees through that (like Rachel saw through Harvey’s lie 2 weeks before – is Harvey so transparent? ). In a flagrant bid to add some episode tension, Cahill says the deal offer is only good for 2 days.


The next day, Mike calls Donna to say he won’t take the deal so don’t make him. Harvey wants to let Rachel know about the deal in the hope she will pressure Mike, but Donna advises both him and Cahill that if Rachel finds out that Mike gave up a chance to be with her sooner than in 2 years, their relationship will not survive! Cahill doesn’t give a shit about Mike’s love life, but when Harvey comes up with a crazy scheme for Cahill to secretly meet with Mike to convince him, Cahill agrees to it.

mike drugged

The crazy scheme involves getting someone in jail to drug Mike’s prison food, which makes Mike pass out in the cafeteria and be taken “to the infirmary” for 8 hours, except really he’s put into Harvey’s car, with the help of the warden, and taken to Rachel’s apartment. She finally OPENS THE DOOR, they have a bittersweet yet joyous sexual reunion, and he tells her about the deal.


Cahill shows up at the apartment building to talk to Mike, and when he finds out Mike is inside post-coitally trading you’re-beautiful, no-you-are compliments with Rachel, he’s all what-the-hell, where-are-your-priorities-man? to Harvey. Wise Harvey knows that a few hours with his One True Love will turn Mike into a snitch, and sure enough, Mike comes out and announces that he told Rachel everything, and he will take the deal. OR WILL HE?

Gallo, by the way, also wants to take the deal Mike offered him – to try to arrange for Gallo to get out on parole in 6 weeks. Harvey does not like this idea, but Mike says okay fine, and somehow files a motion on Gallo’s behalf from jail. OR DOES HE?


Because Rachel is more than just Mike’s moll, she begins work on her Innocence Project death row case. A Mr. Bailey, the convict in question, does not want the help of a mere law student at first, not after he’s been proclaiming his innocence for 10 years and no one would listen, but hey, someone is better than no one. And Rachel confesses to Donna that working on the case keeps her mind off obsessing over Mike in jail, so it’s a Good Thing.


Independent story line #2 finds Louis flirting and clicking with Tara, a pretty architect who shares his interest in opera, ballet and intuitively understands his office space needs too. When Louis confesses to Jessica that he has already fallen in love with Tara, she foresees trouble and forbids him to hire her to remodel the offices. Louis hires her to remodel his Hamptons house into an office instead – anything to spend more time with her doing stupid things like sniffing her neck.

better jess&Stu

Stu Douchebag bought some of Nathan Burns’s company’s shares last week on Harvey’s behalf but is being douchey about them this week, as well as goading Louis into rages for the fun of it, so Jessica elects to put him in his place. She calls him a pissant and orders him to ‘unwind that trade,’ he asks her out (as if), she somehow manipulates a stock he holds – to his disadvantage, and their sparring ends with him hiring PSL as his lawyers. Jessica even gets him to agree to stop harassing Louis. She’s awesome when she lowers her voice an octave and growls out her commands.

Next week: Someone (everyone?) has got trust issues.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.