Suits Recap – S8 E3: Promises, Promises

In which Katrina, Samantha and Alex continue to angle for promotions, Harvey takes pity on a cleaning woman, tender soul Brian Altman has a bigger role than usual, and Donna gets to one-up the firm’s charming rogue landlord David Fox (played by Toronto actor David Alpay, who has an interesting resumé.)

Advantage Donna

Three episodes into the season, and I’m already bored with the competition between Alex and Sam to become name partner. At least Harvey isn’t keeping his promise to Alex (that he’s next) a secret from Zane any longer. Zane’s bright idea for how to handle the fact that he’s promised Samantha the same thing: kick the can down the road and deal with it later. He takes a similar approach when Louis comes to him wanting to promote Katrina to senior partner – Katrina must prove she can manage people first.

Louis asks Katrina to manage/supervise Brian to show her skills. She agrees though she’s stressed about a file she’s working on. She gives Brian one hour to prepare for a meeting with a Mr. Bigelow of Bigelow Textiles (again with the corny company names!), then doesn’t show up for the meeting. Bigelow is pissed when Brian proves to be unfamiliar with the file (though Brian is very nice and apologetic about it – his dialogue in this scene is well written and performed).

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Turns out Katrina was absent because she’s been suffering stress-induced migraines since firing the associates, and she doesn’t want anyone to know that she has a weakness re: her career aspirations. Brian agrees to keep her secret, because he’s a mensch. He keeps it even when Louis gives him total shit for screwing up the meeting.

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Katrina appreciates Brian’s support, tells him any doubts she had about him are gone, and sends him to court alone on the Bigelow file, so that he can get the credit when he wins the case he helped her prepare. She also tells Louis about her migraines and he’s sympathetic. Win-win-win.

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Alex is still wrangling his new client Gavin Andrews, the rich asshole who owns an airline and a Renoir. Gavin’s not happy that Samantha is apparently about to sign his competitor Delta Airlines (come on, as if) as a client. Alex confronts Samantha on the street and tells her to back the hell down. She won’t at first, but capitulates after a weird conversation with Louis, wherein he says inappropriate things about her appearance (Brigitte Nielsen?) and 6′ height (Heigl is  5’8″- 5’9″). She retaliates by placing herself inappropriately close to him in a way that emphasizes their height difference (or the height of her heels), and by talking about puddles. She also tells him to never ask her for a favour. That’s going to end well.

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Of course, the moment Gavin gets what he wants, he asks for more. Forget his earlier sob story about the Renoir having sentimental value because of his dead father, he’s selling it for $66 million and he wants Alex to have the proceeds from the sale laundered. Oh no, not the illegal shit again. Alex runs to Samantha and asks for her help in handling Gavin.

After making it clear she repeatedly told him so, she reminds Alex that Gavin only cares about himself.  Alex interprets this hot tip to mean he should trick Gavin into making Alex the trustee of his off-shore bank account – Alex essentially blackmails him into submission. He then thanks Samantha with ringside UFC (!) tickets. In a meant-to-be peace-making move, she says there’s no point competing with her, because she’s already ahead – her name is next on the wall. So much for kicking the can down the road.

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Harvey encounters a distraught cleaning woman named Anna in the men’s washroom (as one does). He questions her gently and gives her his handkerchief, and upon learning she’s owed overtime pay that she needs for her mother’s medical bills, he offers to look into the matter for her.

Zane and Donna are dead set against riling up the landlord, who has proved to be tetchy in the past, but Harvey’s new motto is What Would Mike Do, so he forges on in an attempt to save a woman of the people.

His first meeting with David Fox quickly degenerates into legal threats. David explains that the cleaning services are subcontracted out, so he has no say in the employees’ pay. Harvey accuses him of breaking landlord-tenant law. After cooling down a little, Harvey decides to refer Anna’s case to the legal aid clinic, but when he travels downtown and finds Tall Nathan and Tall Oliver both out of the office, and the other crusading lawyers up to their ears in work, he leaves.

Harvey & David Fox

David Fox starts doing classic dirty landlord tricks like directing his workmen to be slow to repair the elevators, and having Anna fired. After walking up five flights of stairs,  a sweaty Zane demands Harvey resolve the dispute immediately. Donna and Louis agree.

When Harvey questions how he has alienated everyone at the firm to the point where he is MAKING HIS OWN PHOTOCOPIES, OMG, Donna suggests he misses Mike, and he should call him for advice. Instead, Harvey puts his Mike Ross Thinking Cap on, and comes up with the idea to have the clinic launch a class action suit against David Fox on behalf of all the affected maintenance staff.

Harvey & Donna copy room

Harvey gives Donna the satisfaction of delivering the lawsuit and making a deal with David Fox to avoid it. Fox agrees to have Anna rehired and to pay her and her co-workers properly, in exchange for free legal services from Harvey for one year. Fox wants to make a dinner date with Donna part of the negotiation, but she refuses and tells him to write up the new agreement because she has better things to do with her time. Advantage Donna.

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her latest novel The Showrunner, now available from your favourite bookseller, is a darkly humourous, suspenseful Hollywood-noir novel about female ambition inside the TV biz that a reviewer called a “sophisticated, compelling, and surprisingly complex drama.” Check out its book trailer here:

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Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 10: Donna

In which Andy Malik goes after Harvey by discrediting Donna; Robert Zane attempts to right a past wrong, with Rachel’s help; Louis helps Alex fight against his former law firm; Mike doesn’t do much, and oh yeah, this happens:

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We open with Harvey at home, trying on and discarding ties, on the day Donna is to appear in court, subpoenaed by Malik. Dr. Paula interprets Harvey’s somewhat nervous behaviour as a sign of his great loyalty to his work fam, as opposed to any sublimated feelings he has for Donna, say. Way to self-delude, Dr. P.

At the office, Louis declares there is no need for him to eviscerate Donna in a mock trial because Malik will raise the Danner case from years ago, and what happened is privileged “work product” so Donna won’t have to testify. He’s proven wrong when Malik brings up the Coastal Motors case instead, the one where Donna destroyed a file, which Malik says means she probably also destroyed the memo that never existed in the current Wall St. case.

Malik puts Donna through the wringer on the stand, and implies that she slept her way to her COO position at PSL. Afterwards, Donna lashes out at Louis, and says he’s to blame because he didn’t help her prepare for court. Donna figures out that Holly Cromwell is involved with the leaking of the fake memo to a Times reporter. She finds Holly, apologizes for PSL’s past treatment of her, and asks her to testify. Holly won’t do that, but knowing that she was involved gives the team the leverage they need to scare Malik off the case.  Still intent on bringing Harvey low, Malik announces he’s going after Jessica next, and will get her disbarred for her part in the Mike Ross-was-a-fraud-lawyer situation.

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Jessica shows up in a gorgeous powder blue coat to remind us how much we miss seeing her statuesque form garbed in beautiful expensive clothing. She’s cool with being disbarred – who needs New York to lawyer in, when she’s got Chicago? – and with taking her name off the firm’s wall, because it’s time for the firm to be Harvey’s. Time for Louis and Harvey to buy her out.

Zane père-et-fille are still fighting this Arthur Kittredge bank CEO guy, who years ago harassed Robert’s sister into quitting her job and going into decline before she died of cancer. Flashbacks show the sister to have been strong and smart, and Robert to have been afraid to help her for fear of risking his law career. In the present, Rachel and Robert try to establish that Kittredge had a pattern of discriminating (against women). Robert’s personal grudge and hot temper keep getting in the way of legally taking Kittredge down, but in the end, Rachel negotiates a deal with the bank’s Board that includes a settlement for the loan applicants who were discriminated against, and Kittredge’s resignation.

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Remember how Alex used to work for the evil, vindictive firm of Bratton Gould? Team PSL forced Bratton to resign, and now Gould is coming after Pfizer, the client Alex took with him when he left. Louis helps Alex by directing all the associates to work on his case. He also asks Dr. Lipshitz to impersonate a German pharmaceutical company head and make a fake phone call to head Gould off, but Dr. L declines, for obvious ethical reasons. Louis’s final ploy is to lend Alex his Dictaphone. Alex uses it to secretly tape Gould saying he is only going after Pfizer to punish Alex, which is illegal. The Dictaphone strikes again!

Louis also consults with Dr. Lipshitz about how upset he was when Donna blamed him for letting her go to court unprepared. After Dr. L points out the parallels with Louis’s Sheila situation, Louis apologizes to Donna. He explains that he didn’t want to question her about her feelings for Harvey because he wouldn’t want anyone to ask him about his for Sheila. Mike has earlier counselled Donna to make her feelings for Harvey known, so when Louis says he regrets not having told Sheila he loved her when he had the chance, Donna has a come-to-Donna moment. She kisses Harvey, delighting Darvey shippers the world over, and says, “I just had to know.”

Series creator Aaron Korsh said in a Deadline.com interview  – that also hints at what’s to come when Suits returns in 2018 – that Donna wanted to know how the kiss made her feel, not how Harvey would respond (which he mostly, but not totally, didn’t). We  are left hanging, in suitable summer finale fashion, as to what they each thought or felt.

ICYMI, some off-camera (let’s face it, gossip) notes about two cast members:

  • The news broke in late September that Gina Torres and her husband, actor Laurence Fishburne, have separated, which helps explain why she left Suits last season to return to LA from Toronto. She is now set to return to The Six to shoot her Chicago-set Suits spinoff.
  • Also in late September, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry did make their public debut as a couple at the Invictus Games in Toronto, as was keenly anticipated by royals watchers. For an interesting analysis of the meaning and import of Meghan’s recent Vanity Fair profile, check out the always entertaining Fug Girls’ take on it here.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz. Here’s a trailer for it:

Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 9: Shame

In which Louis hallucinates and babysits (not at the same time, luckily), Harvey goes up against the new Deputy Attorney General in town, and Robert and Rachel Zane work together on a pro bono case.

7211180885db4096ffeef3a954baIt’s the penultimate episode before Suits goes on hiatus, and everyone talks fast so they can get the new story lines underway before the break. Starting with Mike, who tells Harvey a new Deputy Attorney-General has announced he’s going to clean up Wall Street, and wouldn’t it be a kick for Harvey to lock horns with the guy? They quickly sign up as a client a woman investment banker whose firm is being investigated for evading taxes (or something), just so they can defend her against the crusading DAG.  Not sure why that would be fun, but hey, conflict!

Turns out Harvey knows the DAG, a guy named Andy Malik (played by actor Usman Ally,  as seen on Veep), from when they both worked in the DA’s office. Harvey, in his arrogant way, doesn’t remember Andy, but Donna does – as sneaky and conniving. She warns Harvey and Mike not to fuck with him, but they do anyway, and damn if he doesn’t come up with a new sneaky tactic every time they think they’ve outwitted him. By episode’s end, he has threatened to expose shady, Cameron Dennis-related doings that Harvey and Donna were involved with back in the day. This means that Donna may be called on to testify, which means it’s time for another mock trial so Donna can practice not falling apart on the stand. Harvey & Donna ask Louis to conduct the mock trial again, because he proved how incisive (read: cutthroat) he was during the last mock trial, when he got Donna to admit she was in love in Harvey. Donna swears she can take Louis’s hectoring this time.

Louis doesn’t agree to conduct the mock trial at first, because his mental breakdown is proceeding apace, his latest trigger being the the night he spent with Sheila Szaz in the Hotel of Immoral Assignations. During his unshaven walk of shame into the office the morning after, he hallucinates that he is being loudly shamed by more extras than the show has ever assembled on-set – are we supposed to think PSL employs this many people now? He cancels a session with Dr. Lipshitz, and urges Brian to get aggressive with a case involving patent infringement between two pacifier manufacturers. He also a) hallucinates that the CEO of the opposing pacifier company is Sheila’s fiancé and is berating him for sleeping with her, and b) is verbally abusive to Brian after Brian makes a mistake in the wording of a document.

Louis then has a big shouty argument with Gretchen, who won’t back off, because her job is to watch his back, but she promises to knock him the hell out if he treats another associate the way he’s treated Brian.

Gretchen sternly tells Brian to man up, not resign, and to clean up his mess, which he does by finding a solution for the case. A contrite Louis apologizes to Brian, has a session with Dr. Lipshitz, and tells him he is unraveling because he thinks Sheila is the one and he pushed her away and now has nothing. Dr. L would prefer Louis forget about his lost loves right now and work on the lashing out problem. Still contrite, Louis goes to Brian’s apartment and offers to hold the baby for a few hours so Brian can sleep. Brian is so sleep-deprived that he accepts the offer.

Robert Zane asks Rachel to work on a pro bono case with him –  a discrimination suit against a bank that he believes practices predatory lending against people of colour. They work well together and seem to be bonding. But when they depose a black loan officer who insists there is no discrimination at the bank, Robert loses it and calls the bank’s attorney a fool.  Rachel asks Robert what’s really going on, and he admits that he wants to take down the bank’s CEO because many years ago the CEO (then a bank branch manager) harassed and fired Robert’s late sister, and ruined her life. And get this: Robert was inspired by Mike’s commitment to social justice causes to go after this old enemy. Double Aww. And they’re not giving up on the case yet!

At first Donna won’t tell Rachel how her ‘date’ with Mark at the Hotel of Immoral Assignations went, or rather, did not go. When she’s had a few days to get over feeling like shit for even going over there, she tells Rachel the whole sordid story, with this punch line: she doesn’t regret putting Harvey over Mark in the days when she and Mark were dating. She regrets putting Harvey over herself.

Next week: On the summer season finale, Mike advises Donna to tell Harvey how she feels about him.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 8: 100

Patrick J. Adams directs the series’ much-promoted 100th episode, in which a fierce Robert Zane throws Harvey, none too gently, against a wall; Louis’s comedy bits make me laugh; and the writers upend my expectations (Frank Gallo dies! the prison case wraps up with 2 episodes left to go in this part of the season!) to pleasing effect.

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Let’s start with Donna’s hey-how-are-you call to her ex, AKA is calling an ex ever a good idea? Mark may be a (past) giver of leather-bound Shakespeare sonnet books, but he is also currently (and unhappily) married, a detail he neglects to mention till he and Donna are well into a cozy restaurant lunch. After that revelation, Donna tells him not to contact her until he’s single. Instead, he calls to say he’ll soon be in the city (from Connecticut), at the Carlyle Hotel (really Toronto’s Fairmont Royal York, unless the glass doors at the Carlyle are embossed with RY logos), for a conference, maybe she can drop by.

Donna has no intention of taking Mark up on his skeezy invitation, that is until she has a hella awkward run-in with Dr. Paula at the office. Dr. P has dropped in to leave Harvey a note or maybe a gift in honour of their 2 month anniversary.  I’ll praise Director Patrick J. and Sarah Rafferty for the relatable cutaways (pretending I know film direction terms now) during this scene, wherein Donna makes cringey faces to herself during the fakely bright and friendly convo that ensues, a conversation that Dr. P. sees through immediately because she’s a psychiatrist, yo.

The combo of Mark making caddish advances and Harvey being happy in his new relationship makes Donna sad. She refuses Rachel’s invitation to go for drinks, gets gussied up, and heads to the Hotel of Immoral Assignations. Luckily, her better instincts  – and a sweet text from Rachel, saying that Donna deserves the best – prevail, and she does not enter Mark’s room.

On to Louis: he flies off the handle because Gretchen requested that various Ivy League law schools send over resumes of new grad candidates to fill Stephanie’s now-vacant position (never mind that Stephanie was a 4th-year associate) and Columbia did not send any, damn it. After a decent comic bit featuring Louis’s ability to tell how many file folders he is holding from flipping through the stack and listening to the sound they make, he storms over to Columbia to complain. There, he discovers that his ex Sheila, who would not leave Harvard for him, now lives in New York, is engaged, and works at Columbia. She didn’t send any applicants for the job because she didn’t want to Louis to be hurt when he found out how much she has moved on.

Back at the office, Louis is sad that two loves of his life have rejected him in one year, and refuses to take Sheila’s calls. She eventually gets through and says she wants to use his body once more before she gets married in two weeks. Their phone conversation about what she would like to do with him sexually is funny because it contains so many incomplete sentences. And because their sex talk is ridiculous.

Sheila has booked ‘their’ special hotel room, also in the Royal York, and invites Louis to come over. He tells Rachel he is tempted to do something wrong without specifying what, and Rachel tells him she knows he has a good heart, no matter what happens.  Poor Louis goes and does ridiculous sex things with Sheila anyway.

The prison case: Harvey, Mike and Alex make a plan to take down Reform Corp and Masterson Construction and to save Alex from his evil overlords at the same time. Phase 1 of the plan is for Harvey to hand over the class action suit to Robert Zane, who has no client conflicts in the game, and whose role in the strained Batman and Robin analogy the show keeps pushing is apparently that of Commissioner Gordon.

Zane gets fired up about the case, because of the injustice and oppression it represents for mainly black prisoners. He asks for a huge settlement from Reform Corp (still repped by Harvey) and when that’s turned down, wants Frank Gallo to testify (like Mike wanted before). The PSL boys don’t want that though, because Alex will be ruined if the prison conspiracy comes to light. Rachel, of all people, finds a way to discredit her dad and Frank Gallo in court, by bringing up the photos of her that he took from Mike’s phone in prison back in the day, and passed around to the other inmates. After roughing up Harvey in a men’s restroom for that trick, Zane video-interviews Gallo anyway, and gets incriminating testimony from him about the Reform Corp CEO, a very bad guy named Shapiro.

All conflicts resolve when the gang learns that Gallo has been killed in jail (by Shapiro’s henchmen). Using Gallo’s pre-death taped interview – now admissible in court as a death-bed confession – as a weapon, they get Shapiro to sign a confession of conspiracy to fraud, and to agree to the original large settlement of the class action suit. They also convince very bad lawyer Bratton to resign from his firm, and to tear up Alex’s affidavit, the one that has him falsely taking responsibility for the prison-related wrong-doing. And no one is going is prison!

Alex no longer has a black cloud hanging over him, and tells Harvey they’re square, though Harvey thinks Alex owes him now. Mike apologizes to Zane for opposing him in court. He also delivers a generous cheque to Gallo’s daughter, and tells him Gallo was a decent man (you know, for a murderer/psychopath).

Now Harvey and Dr. Paula can go out for their romantic 2 month anniversary dinner! She gives him a small wrapped gift that he does not open, and he gives her the key to his apartment (the one Donna returned to him last week) in exchange. She is not fooled, she knows he didn’t know about the anniversary and had not prepared a gift. She still likes/loves him, though.

Next week: banter, jokes, and, I hope, a break from prisons.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 7: Full Disclosure

In which we find out Alex’s secret and it’s a doozy, Anita Gibbs and her expensive-looking wig make a return appearance, we get an origin story on Louis and his shrink, and the flashback filter makes everyone look vampirish and sickly, except maybe Donna in her fake bangs.

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We start with Mike telling Rachel he plans to take the prison case to criminal court because he can’t let it go, and doing that would not be a violation of his agreement with Harvey. She is fine with his decision as long as she doesn’t have to lie to Harvey about it.

Mike tries to give the file to his old nemesis Anita Gibbs. And I have to say here that the way that Mike has faced down his biggest enemies, Gibbs and Frank Gallo, and asked them to work with him on the case, is either a measure of his brave and bold resolve, or is just crazy. Also possibly GoT-ish, from what I know of the show, to make alliances with people you despise in order to fight a big foe.

Anita will only pursue the case for the Dept of Justice if Mike can bring her proof of conspiracy between the two corporations involved, and that proof has to be from the company PSL does not represent because of attorney-client privilege.

Mike gets the proof he needs by asking Benjamin, the PSL IT guy, to do some illegal hacking of the company that isn’t their client, Reform Corp (shades of Mr. Robot‘s Evil Corp or what). But Harvey catches wind of Mike’s plan, and quickly signs up Reform Corp as a client, so it too will be protected.

And why does Harvey do this? Because he owes Alex big-time, thanks to what went down several years ago, pre-Mike, in the days when Harvey and Louis were associates and the Hardman in Pearson Hardman was running the firm. Back then, Louis gets a partnership ahead of Harvey, and Harvey is pissed. But the first time his lawyer pal Alex, an associate at Bratton Gould, floats the idea that they offer BG  a deal to take the two of them on as junior partners for the price of another more senior solo lawyer, Harvey says no, the deal doesn’t sound good enough for him.

Past Jessica makes past Harvey work on a case with past Louis. Louis lords it over Harvey, and when Harvey complains, Jessica tells him to stop whining and suck it up. Sort of like how she has had to rise above sexism, racism, and arrogant bossmen on her way to becoming name partner.

After Jessica puts him in his place, Harvey is humiliated and angry. He tells Alex to go ahead and make BG that 2-for-1 offer and gives his word he’ll take the job if his rock star rider type requirements are met. Bratton agrees to the terms but warns Alex he will be in deep shit if Harvey does not accept.

No surprise, Harvey changes his mind – mainly because Jessica told him he was the best lawyer in the firm, she wants him to be her work husband, and she has made Hardman promise Harvey is next up for a partnership. Alex is screwed, but he accepts Harvey’s decision graciously. And now Harvey owes Alex a big favour.

What was unknown to Harvey until the present was that after Alex’s play backfired, he was treated like shit by BG for years, until the day he was asked to take on a new client, Masterson Construction. Masterson partnered with Reform Corp and together they illegally and secretly used prisoners to build prisons. Alex didn’t know how criminal the two firms were being until a prison guard – who had told Alex that an inmate died during construction – was killed. Alex tried to extricate himself from the whole mess because murder! – and discovered that Bratton and Masterson Constr. had fixed the books so that Alex was complicit in every underhanded move they made. Rather than blow the whistle and end up in jail, which would leave his daughter fatherless (this guy has a family and personal life?), Alex stayed quiet at BG, his secret festering for years, until Harvey came along and offered him a partnership at PSL.

Remember a few weeks ago when BG was coming after PSL’s clients, and Alex signed a paper that made BG stop doing that? That paper said Alex was responsible for everything bad that ever happened with the prison building scheme. Now we know why he was so eager to stop Mike’s class action suit.

Alex starts the episode confessing all to Harvey, and ends it confessing all to Mike, against Harvey’s orders. Good thing too, because now Harvey can stop threatening to fire Mike for persisting with the case and they can all try to take down Masterson Construction and Reform Corp together before everyone’s futures are threatened. Especially since the boss of Masterson turned down a big cheque Harvey offered him to no longer be their client. He’d rather have them in his clutches, bwah-ha-ha.

Still in the past, Jessica commands Louis to go into therapy. Louis calls Dr. Lipshitz a Nazi upon hearing his German accent, but thaws a little when he learns Dr. L is a German Jew. He thaws further upon learning that Dr. L is excited to work with him, given that Louis is transparently screwed up and given to revelatory outbursts about his psyche. When Jessica hears that Louis is working on himself, she gives him responsibility for the associates for the first time, which doesn’t make much sense but okay, sure.

Also in the past, Donna and her bangs give Harvey grief about not consulting her when he was thinking about the two of them jumping ship for Bratton Gould. And she has a six month anniversary dinner with ‘Mark,’ a guy she’s dating who is thoughtful enough to give her a copy of Shakespeare’s sonnets as an anniversary gift. Too bad he breaks up with her on the spot because he’s sick of hearing her talk non-stop about Harvey.

Next week: In the series’s 100th episode, Rachel joins Team Prison Case, and we get the return of (the) Mark.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 6: Home to Roost

In which Harvey finds out Mike is still working on the prison case, Alex gets the case dismissed in court because he’s afraid his secret will come out, and Donna briefly pretends that she knew that Harvey and Dr. Paula were dating when she did not.

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Let’s start with Mike and his lying ways. He tells Rachel, still pissed after their argument the night before, that he can’t back down on the case because he is helping people. This is the same justification he used for lying about being a lawyer all those years, so at least he’s consistent. A consistent liar, that is.

Frank Gallo leaves Harvey a phone message warning that he and Mike had better not be trying to fuck him over again. Mike lies about why he contacted Gallo and brushes off Harvey’s warnings about him. Harvey pays a visit to Oscar Reyes and gets confirmation that Mike and Tall Oliver are working together on the prison class action suit. Harvey confronts Mike and tells him he must get off the case. Mike still wants to see it through. In addition to being consistent, he’s stubborn.

After another tiff with Rachel, who is angry she had to lie to Harvey about Mike’s whereabouts, Mike tells Tall Oliver he has to quit the case. He yells at TO to get the goddamn job done alone. Tall Oliver is all “this  motherfucker” –  (by which I believe he means the case) – “is going down” and seems to be doing well in court the next morning, but Alex strides in, tells the judge about the agreement Mike signed, and gets the case dismissed.

Back at the office, Alex and Mike argue loudly about what went down in the courtroom. Harvey takes Alex’s side and tells Mike he made his bed, so go lie in it. But when Harvey and Alex are alone, Harvey rebukes him for having the suit dismissed and asks what’s really going on with him and this prison case.

Mike slinks off to see Oscar Reyes, who is justifiably pissed that he turned down a generous settlement on Mike’s advice so that the class action suit could proceed, and now he has nothing. Mike assures him the case is not over, and he will make it right. Bets on whether this case will be resolved before the show takes its mid-season break in September? I bet not.

When not dealing with his unruly underling, Harvey screws up the courage to tell Donna he’s dating Dr. Paula, which Dr. P thinks he should do now that she is referring to him as not only her boyfriend, but as her outstanding boyfriend. Also because she knows from when she was analyzing Harvey that Donna loves him, and Harvey needs to let her move on.

Donna puts on an amused air of superiority when Harvey finally tells her and says she knew all along.  But she confides in Rachel that she didn’t see the relationship coming because she didn’t want to. She hates it that the news bothers her, and she really hates it that she lied and pretended she knew. To her credit, she soon admits to Harvey that she didn’t know, and says she’s happy for him. She gives him back his apartment key, a symbolic gesture to suggest she’s let go of him. Has she, though? I still think Dr. P. will be gone by season’s end.

Louis gets a lot of scenes again this week, since he is being sued for sexual harrassment by dour Stephanie, who has moved on to the Zane law firm. Stephanie has a roomful of witnesses who heard Louis disparage her likelihood of having children when she worked in the PSL bullpen. She also has her reputation to protect from people who think she left PSL because she couldn’t cut it in the big leagues.

Louis goes about preparing his case in the worst ways possible: he tries to get mild-mannered associate Brian Altman (nicely under-played by Jake Epstein of deGrassi and Broadway fame) to say he’ll fudge the truth if asked, and he goes to see Stephanie against Katrina’s explicit advice and insults her again. His aggressive approach leads Stephanie to subpoena Brian, Rachel and Donna to testify for her side.

Katrina tries and fails to broker a deal with Stephanie. On Brian’s advice, Louis visits her once more, apologizes sincerely, and explains that his outburst was caused by his deep disappointment after being dumped by Tara, when his hopes of becoming a parent were dashed along with his hopes of ever being loved. A compassionate Stephanie can relate to the fear of ending up alone and childless after over-devoting oneself to lawyering, and agrees to drop the suit.

A sincerely contrite Louis thanks Donna for her advice on dealing with Stephanie, and Donna gives him back responsibility for the associates, now that he’s become more sensitive. Louis completes his redemption arc (of the episode) by apologizing to Brian and telling him he can go home early and play with his new baby. Brian wonders if he is being fired or punked, and Louis presents him with a custom-made “You’ve Been Spitt Up” onesie. Now available at the Suits USA online merchandise store!

Sidenote of the week: Did y’all see the big announcement that Gina Torres will star in a Jessica Pearson Suits spin-off set in Chicago, to do with politics, that will premiere in 2018? I could have sworn a big reason given for Torres leaving Suits was that she wanted to be closer to home and family (i.e. not live in Toronto for 9 months of the year) but the new show will be also be filmed in Toronto with same exec producers and production company, also the same costume designer that clothes Jessica in her amazing power wardrobe on Suits. Looks like I’ll have to recap that show when it comes out too.

Next week: Alex is It in the Everyone-Has-A-Secret game.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 5: Brooklyn Housing

In which Mike lies and lies, Harvey has a secret, Donna wears a cleavage-y suit, and Louis represents Dr. Paula against her ex-boyfriend.

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Mike may or may not be working on a pro bono case to do with Brooklyn Housing, but he says he is when lying to Tall Nathan, Harvey, and Rachel about the class action prison lawsuit that he promised Harvey, in writing, he would not work on.

Despite Mike’s years of experience with lying, Tall Nathan and Rachel catch him out soon enough. Tall Nathan is fine with it, because this time Harvey is the one being screwed. Rachel is not fine, because she covered for Mike with Harvey, and now she’s starting to wonder what Mike’s word is worth. Like, we don’t even know if he set a wedding date with her last week like he promised he would, because priorities.

After tracking down more ex-cons who were framed into serving extended time, Mike and Tall Oliver realize this prison money-making scam is going on in a bunch of private prisons, which leads Mike to visit last season’s Mr. Evil, hardened convict Frank Gallo. (Groan with me now if you were hoping Gallo would not return this season, or ever.)

Gallo has seen it all, so sure, he knows that tough guy cons are sometimes paid to pick a fight with a prisoner about to be released. He’s done it himself in the past, though that was not why he attacked Mike at Danbury. Mike asks him to testify about what he knows in return for an early release, but he can’t trick Gallo twice – the last time Gallo was promised a release, he got an extended stay himself instead.

Tall Oliver suggests Mike find another reason Gallo might sing, and Mike discovers Gallo has a daughter (estranged) who could use a part of the millions that will be up for grabs if they win the class action suit. He invites Gallo to join the suit, and Gallo concedes that money is a good motivator for him to supply Mike with damning info, but not until he sees some of that money.

Harvey works on a case that involves Lockwood Energy and some other energy producing company. The details of it are boring, but Harvey faces a tight deadline (as usual) to prove that company A stole some technology from company B. When his meetings with the two CEO’s don’t get him anywhere, he asks Holly Cromwell to do some of her patented industrial spying, which may or may not involve sex, and how uncomfortable do those super-tight dresses she wears look? Holly takes on the assignment as an audition – she wants to leave her non-lucrative head-hunting job and be hired fulltime by PSL as a consultant.

Harvey, a terrible manager, is ready to hire Holly without thinking much about it, but COO Donna says not so fast and calls Holly in for an interview. Holly impresses Donna with her honesty,  and produces the needed intel for the Lockwood Energy case, but when Harvey later offers her a job, Holly has decided to be a freelance investigator/spy and turns it down.

Why do so many of my notes from this episode concern Louis? Because Harvey asks him to help Dr. Paula with a lawsuit brought by her ex-partner, which she does NOT want Harvey to get involved with or know the details of. Louis agrees to take on the case, and gives his word he will not tell Harvey anything about it, AND he will keep Harvey’s relationship with Dr. Paula secret from Donna.

The back story of the lawsuit goes like this: the ex (name of Jacob), also a psychiatrist, was cheating on Dr. P. When she found out, they split up both their business partnership and their relationship. Afterwards, he wanted to get back together but she didn’t. Some of Jacob’s psychiatric patients wanted to be treated by Dr. P. instead, so she took them on. Now Jacob is accusing her of stealing his clients in violation of their partnership dissolution agreement, and if she won’t pay a big settlement, he threatens to report her to the “Ethics Board” for dating a former patient before the official waiting period was up. (Sidenote: a quick Google search indicates there is no such thing as an official waiting period, and that the AMA frowns on almost all doctor-patient relationships. But feel free to correct me in the comments if you know differently.)

Louis manages the case well. He has a few angry outbursts with Jacob and his lawyer, and accuses Jacob of a) blackmail and b) acting out of revenge, but his outbursts are semi-appropriate, and he confesses to his own shrink that he feels sympathy for Jacob, the spurned man. After Louis finds out from Dr. P. that Jacob has been stalking her for months, he threatens to have Jacob charged with the crime, and the lawsuit is dropped. A contrite and tearful Jacob explains that he only sued and stalked because he was  heartbroken and disappointed to see that his dream of a family life with Dr. P. was over, and it was all his fault.

Louis’s shrink Dr. Lipshitz points out the parallels between Jacob’s and Louis’s situations (both fucked up their relationships and wanted to get back with the woman they love), and Louis acknowledges that he still needs to work on himself re: his breakup with Tara.

Harvey somehow finds out – not from Louis – that Jacob cheated on Dr. P.  He asks her why she didn’t tell him that, was it because of his known disdain for people who cheat? She says some guff in reply about how she was afraid she might seem unlovable to him if he knew she had been betrayed, which, what? He assures her she’s the opposite of unlovable and they kiss, though rather passionlessly.

Next week: Mike keeps on lying, and everyone wants him to drop the prison case.

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.