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Archive for the ‘Suits Season 6 Recap’ Category

In which Harvey falters, Donna has a consciousness awakening, Rachel stands up for her man, Louis’s heart is broken, Mike passes the bar, and Jessica and her killer power wardrobe return!

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Mike drops by the legal aid clinic the morning after he and Harvey blackmailed their way to a big settlement from Velocity Technologies or whatever the fuck the mining company is called, and drops off the clinic’s cut for bringing the lawsuit: $50,000. Tall Nathan is happy with this large-for-him sum, which will pay the clinic’s rent, and grants Mike a few days off. Mike doesn’t tell him his character and fitness hearing for the bar is the next day.

Harvey and Mike think the hearing is in the bag until Mike’s arch-nemesis Anita Gibbs shows up to tell them she’s joined the committee, she will NEVER vote for Mike, and the decision must be unanimous, so see ya!

Harvey spends much of the episode trying to find dirt on the committee member who gave up his seat to Gibbs, a guy named Sampson, because Harvey is convinced Gibbs dirty tricked her way onto the committee. He pays Jerry, the thug hacker who keeps office hours in a bar, to dig up some Sampson dirt, and gets Donna on the case, both to no avail. On Donna’s advice, he visits Sampson at a health club, bluffs that he knows he has a secret, and slams him up against the lockers, but Sampson still appears to be squeaky clean.

The hearing begins, with blackmailed-by-Harvey-but-they’re-all-good-now committee chairman Seidel pulling for Mike,  and Gibbs gunning for him. When she questions Mike’s deal for early release prison, he brings in a character witness: Julius, the prison psychologist. Like in every other episode of Suits, the friendly witness is reluctant to testify when initially asked, but shows up in court anyway. He makes a convincing case for Mike being a changed man (changed for the better, that is) since his prison stint. He also does some armchair psychoanalysis of Gibbs, and calls her out on the integrity front, because in his opinion, she has none. Okay, then.

When the hearing takes an overnight break,  Harvey finds Gibbs and hands her an incriminating file on Liberty Rail that he tried to give her earlier this season, so she can nail the bastards in her supposed justice-seeking way. He says the file has no strings attached, but she wants to make a deal: him for Mike, like he once offered, before Mike opted to go to prison instead. Oh no! Is Harvey going to fail Mike AND get nailed himself? Of course he isn’t.

The next morning at the hearing, Gibbs asks Mike, as she promised Harvey she would, if anyone at PSL knew he was a fraud. In a beyond corny, soap operatic moment, the camera pans all the cast members’ anxious faces while Mike takes the longest pause ever. Before he answers, Jessica slides into the room in her magisterial black suit with an asymmetrical neckline, and says she knew. She also tells the room about a time when Gibbs was a young(er) prosecutor and showed compassion to a medical student who stole prescription pads to self-medicate for pain. Gibbs had the charge reduced to a misdemeanour, the medical student became an ER doctor who saves lives daily and everyone won. Jessica suggests that the Mike situation is analogous. Let him pass the bar so he can help people!

To the surprise of very few, Mike passes the hearing and the bar, though it’s not till the gang is back at the office celebrating the victory that Jessica says Harvey summoned her (see, he didn’t fail Mike!), cites Aesop’s Fable The Wind and the Sun  (say what?), and explains why she told the medical student story. Turns out the student was Sampson’s godson, and Jessica was letting Gibbs know, gently, and without slamming her into a locker, that Team Mike was aware that Gibbs had leveraged her long-ago mercy to get Sampson’s committee seat. Rather than demanding that Gibbs be ousted from the committee, Jessica gave Gibbs the option to look graceful in defeat by passing Mike’s application. Which she did, so yay Jessica, she can now go off to star in her Suits spinoff.

And Mike is coming back to the firm, after some tense conversations with Tall Nathan and Tall Oliver about his true motives in pursuing the Velocity case. Tall Nathan was reluctantly ready to have Mike return to the legal aid clinic, as long as he would bring more cases that result in big rent-paying cheques, but when Harvey offers Mike a big salary to stay at PSL, Mike asks him to double it so he can use the extra money to help fund the clinic, and he strikes a deal to bring in the clinic lawyers whenever he wants on PSL cases. Which means Tall Oliver may recur next season? And Mike gets Harvey’s office (though not the signed basketballs and vintage LP’s, come on now) because Harvey is going to take over Jessica’s.

In other story lines, Louis and Tara are having couple trouble, not because Tara can’t handle the truth about Louis’s complicity in Mike’s fraud, but because of the harsh way he spoke to her when she said she needed to think about that confession. With their future together in jeopardy, Louis needs a distraction, so he takes on a software company that is suing Donna, Benjamin and Stu’s company because the software Benjamin wrote for ‘the Donna’ is similar to the other company’s in some significant way. Louis swears he will not fly off the handle with these software guys, and he doesn’t, though he is unable to dismantle or dismiss their suit.

Everyone agrees Donna et al. should take the buyout offered by the other company and give up on the device. Which prompts a disappointed Donna to tell Harvey that it wasn’t money she was after in producing the Donna – she wants something more from her life than to be a legal secretary. Left ambiguous is whether she’s looking for something in the love, marriage, and children line, or something career-related. Maybe she can be admitted to the bar next without having gone to law school.

A kind-hearted Gretchen pops in for one brief scene to tell Louis he is worth loving. Tara breaks up with him by voicemail anyway, in a scene that calls for Rick Hoffman to break down on camera while listening to a message we do not hear, and for Rachel to come around his desk and give him a consolatory hug. What with her standing up at Mike’s hearing to challenge Anita Gibbs and this, Rachel wins the prize for most supportive character of the week.

Suits returns in the summer of 2017 for season 7 (!) with Harvey and Mike reunited at PSL, no threats hanging over anyone’s heads, and Louis and Donna living in Sad Land.

KimMoritsuguTheHungryNovelist

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

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In which we lowly scrubs who didn’t go to law school figure out what quid pro quo means (it’s Latin for “this for that”), the gang rallies to help Mike, Donna gets a comeuppance, Stu Douchebag completes his redemption arc from earlier in the season, and Jessica still does not return, damn it.

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Mike’s original client in the lawsuit, the miner turned cancer-stricken grill man, asks for an update on the lawsuit, finds out a $100 million offer was made and demands that it be accepted. He doesn’t care that Harvey is negotiating that settlement upwards in what Mike calls a good cop/bad cop approach, which might not be the best way to describe your tactics to a cancer-stricken grill man who’s looking out for his fellow sick miners.

Later that night, Harvey shows up to tell Mike he’s going to pass his bar admission hearing, thanks to Seidel being a dirty crook who is now Harvey’s puppet, hurray! But we gotta drop the lawsuit, okay?

Not okay. Mike would rather give up on his bar application then disappoint the miners, because he’s Mr. Integrity. For today, anyway. In a confessional moment  the next morning, possibly caused by the sight of a pants-less but heavy sweater-wearing Rachel – who in real life dresses like this at home? No one – Mike says that really, he’s fine with not becoming a lawyer, and he kinda wishes Harvey had never brought it up as a possibility.

Back at the legal clinic, Tall Oliver implores Mike to tell Tall Nathan about his ulterior motives re: the lawsuit.  Mike says there’s nothing to tell. He is withdrawing his bar application, and PSL is no longer involved, so there. But when he goes back to Palmer on his own, Palmer is all, you’re nothing without the mighty Harvey Specter. My final offer is 10 million, take it or leave it.

Harvey won’t give up on Mike, and asks Louis to introduce him to Jerry, a thuggish hacker who could get into the Velocity company files and find out who is conducting industrial espionage for them. Jerry points them instead to a female headhunter/spy named Ms. Cromwell who seduces male clients and worms company secrets out of them at Palmer’s behest. Harvey gets  Rachel to dress up in a lace cocktail dress and chat with and threaten Ms. Cromwell at a bar, with Harvey as backup. And this glamourous cop, bad cop approach works!

Mike is not too happy that Harvey went for the dirty tricks when Mike told him not to, and did he have to involve (a willing and supportive) Rachel too? But it’s hard to argue about trivialities like blackmail and dubious quid pro quo exchanges when the prize package consists of a $200 mm deal for the miners, the restoration of Seidel to his old job, and a bar admission hearing for Mike after all.

In non-Mike-centric news, Donna wants to pitch “the Donna” to venture capitalists (VC’s) of her professional acquaintance. She starts by practicing her pitch on Stu Less-and-less-of-a Douchebag, who is not a VC, but is enough of a mensch to take her seriously. He offers to invest his own money to produce the device, in return (this for that, get it?) for 90% of the company. She refuses his offer, and goes instead with a nervous Benjamin (the software ‘genius’ who programmed the device) to see some Actual Douchebag VC’s who know Harvey. They listen to her politely, but when she sneaks back to the conference room afterwards to eavesdrop on their post-pitch chatter, they’re dissing her because she’s – shudder – a lowly legal secretary. She tries to quit the enterprise, and a sweet (on her?) Benjamin recites back her words to him about how they shouldn’t give up on their dream.  A humbled Donna returns to Stu and asks if his offer is still good. It is, on the same terms. Looks like this unlikely trio is in business!

Louis is genuinely willing to help Harvey get Mike into the bar, but he’s stressed about whether he should tell Tara that he used his knowledge of Mike’s fraud to become name partner in seasons past. Especially since the last time he told a woman he loved (Sheila Saz) about his involvement in the whole mess, she broke up with him. When he asks Rachel for advice on the topic of secrets between engaged persons, she advises him to tell Tara, and soon. He follows that advice, but Tara does not take it well – she needs to get away for a bit to think about whether she wants to stay with him – and he is upset. End scene.

Next week: Anita Gibbs and her helmet hair are back, and she would like to trade Harvey’s future for Mike’s.

KimMoritsuguTheHungryNovelist

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

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In which we get more self-mocking jokes (yay), more of “the Donna” A.I. device (boo), and is it just me, or does it seem like the cast and budget for the show have shrunk since Gina Torres left? Important clients are referred to but not seen, associates are hired but given no lines nor face time, regular recurring characters (Gretchen, Katrina) disappear from week to week. What is this, Nashville after it moved to CMT?

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More about the meal/presentation that Katrina and Rachel mastermind for nought later. This episode is mostly about the lawsuit that Mike prepares, with Harvey’s help, against Velocity Technologies, a company that owns mines but has a fancy corporate office in Manhattan, and speaking of plausibility, how likely is it that an ex-miner who is dying of cancer would man the grill at an old-timey diner in New York?

Mike’s class action lawsuit is supposed to a) help all the miners  who were exposed to poisonous substances and previously took a small settlement when they should be entitled to millions; b) require Velocity to admit guilt as well pay out those millions, thereby leading to a drop in the stock price, as requested by Crooked Craig, the bar admissions influencer who can sway Rachel’s character and fitness test hearing; and c) cause Crooked Craig to recommend that Mike be admitted to the bar.

The obstacles in Mike’s path to bring this suit include his boss Tall Nathan, who rightly suspects Mike is up to something shady when he enlists the help of Tall Oliver from the legal clinic to prepare the suit; the Velocity CEO Jim Palmer, who sees through the suit almost immediately;  and the fact that bringing a lawsuit for the purpose of driving down a stock price is illegal.

Mike lies to Tall Oliver and Tall Nathan about his self-serving motives in bringing the suit, and when challenged by Palmer, improvises that Pearson, Specter, Litt is acting with him. This leads to a meeting between Harvey and Palmer, during which they spit at each other and throw around settlement figures in the hundreds of millions. Palmer then reveals that Crooked Craig was not so much leaking company secrets through his mistress as he was selling them. So Crooked Craig should not be judging anyone’s character, but he is a good candidate for blackmail. Harvey tells him he now MUST sponsor Mike to be admitted to the bar.

In an attempt to get to know each other better, Louis and Tara look at his old high school and college yearbooks (he was in glee club, natch), and she later lends him a sympathetic ear when he confides some work troubles, so things are good between them for now.

What’s not going so well is the co-managing partner relationship between Louis and Harvey. Louis wants Harvey to attend a meeting with an unseen major client named Carly Donahue. Jessica and Louis formerly put on a big presentation to Carly each year to review the legal side of her business, and Louis thinks Harvey should be there in Jessica’s absence. Harvey says he will come, then cancels because of the Velocity thing. Donna suggests Louis enlist the help of Katrina and Rachel instead, and they together come up with the brill idea to plan the presentation around a nine course, chef-prepared themed tasting menu that capitalizes on Carly’s interest in good food and wine. Katrina & Rachel also have a nice bonding moment when Katrina tells Rachel how awesome Robert Zane was when Katrina worked for her, and how proud he is of Rachel.

But we get to see zero food, wine, chef or presentation, let alone Carly Donahue herself, because I don’t know why. And though the presentation was apparently well done, Carly fires the firm afterwards because she felt disrespected by Harvey. Thanks for nothing, Harvey.

As for the silly “the Donna” story line: Donna tells Benjamin it’s not enough for the device (which is so sophisticated and cutting edge that it looks like a 20 year old pager) to solve people’s problems – it should listen as well as talk, and support people’s feelings. Benjamin tries to program it to be more compassionate, and suffers a self-esteem crisis that he cannot seem to. Or can he? When Donna confesses to it about the mistake she made of suggesting that Katrina and Rachel sub in for Harvey, the device speaks to her sympathetically in her own voice. Hey, it maybe works, whoopee, I don’t care.

Some of this week’s jokes did land for me though, including the ones about Luke Perry, croissants vs. bagels, Louis’s multiple experiences with orthodontic braces, and the wearing of size 13 shoes by Jessica, which she does not, I bet. Though she too is Tall.

Next week: In the penultimate episode of the season, Mike is willing to give up being a real lawyer for the sake of the sick miners, but Harvey still wants to fight for Mike’s future.

KimMoritsuguTheHungryNovelist

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

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In which welcome flashes of self-mocking humour replace last week’s angsty mother issues; the Mike and Harvey story lines intersect, as well they should; and our anti-heroes contemplate, for the nth time, taking ethically questionable actions to further their own semi-virtuous ends.

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Harvey is relaxing at home with a drink when Mike drops over to admit that his hissy fit of a few weeks ago was drummed-up conflict for the sake of TV drama, so let’s be friends and banter again, and hey, wanna be best man at the wedding? Harvey accepts and offers his fabulous $12 million+ Toronto condo as a wedding venue, and Mike makes a joke that Harvey had better not fuck (cough) Donna, the maid of honour. Bros making dirty jokes – they must be best buds!

The next day at the office, Rachel goes to Louis, who goes to Harvey, for help with an alarming letter she received that indicates she will not have a character and fitness interview/hearing with regard to her admission to the bar. They all fear Rachel is being punished for Mike’s criminal past, but Harvey and Louis quickly determine that the bar committee guy in charge, who might be a lawyer (it wasn’t clear), used this letter to lure the known-to-be-ethically-loose Harvey into his office so he can ask him to do something shady in exchange for reinstating Rachel’s interview slot and maybe ensuring she is admitted to the bar. The something shady: sue this guy’s competitor for some serious reason that will drive down the competitor’s stock price.

The best part of this scene: when Mr. Shady admits he is to blame for his competitor’s success  because he stupidly disclosed company secrets to his mistress who leaked them to the competitor, and Harvey makes an exasperated, what’s-with-everyone-and-the-infidelity? face.

Harvey gets Rachel’s interview back on the schedule, and considers whether to launch a fake lawsuit (which would be a criminal offence) or to find a solid reason to launch a real one. He also asks  Mike if he’d like to help out because Harvey might be able to get Mike admitted to the bar too in the process. But born again do-gooder Mike wants no part of any funny business that might land him back in jail.

The team at the legal clinic are still fighting the eviction case of Sophia, the single mother tenant. Turns out she didn’t hand over the rent cheque Mike gave her the night before because she had to take her asthmatic son to the hospital. Mike rushes over to see the hard ass lawyer of the landlord but no, she won’t accept the rent cheque 20 minutes past the deadline, and she looks forward to obliterating Tall Oliver in court again. Mike negotiates a $25K settlement and thinks that’s a good deal, but a naive and emotional/overacting Sophia wants $500K and to go to court.

Tall Oliver would like to argue the case again to make up for choking last time. Mike wants Marissa to do it instead, because she is the smarter lawyer on the team,  and come on, look at that hair – it probably has magical legal powers.  She has a sick dad to look after though, so Mike asks Tall Nathan for help. However, Nathan will not argue the case himself and he forbids Mike from petitioning to sit with Tall Oliver and coach him. If Mike does that, Nathan will fire his ass.

Mike spends a whole night rehearsing and prepping Tall Oliver, but on court day, Tall Oliver chokes AGAIN – poor guy can’t pivot – and the case is lost. Mike realizes that the best way to do good is to do bad first. He tells Harvey he’s in for some shady shit if it means he can become a licensed lawyer.

In other minor subplots:

  • Donna sexually harasses Benjamin the IT guy by uttering tired double entendres when he comes to update the operating system on her computer. His response to her ‘jokes’ is to tell her he has been recording her various smug slogans and asides all these months and has created a little computer box thing called The Donna, which talks back in Donna’s voice when you address it. He hopes to market this marvel (as if). Despite her extensive black ops past, Donna has no qualms about her computer having been bugged, and falls in love with the device until Rachel points out it lacks Donna’s intuition, empathy and heart. Unfortunately, Benjamin intends to retool it, so this is not the end of that.
  • Somewhere in there, Donna gets in a good joke line to Rachel that Mike needs to pick a hairstyle and stick to it.
  • Louis is all set to go to Tara’s sonogram appointment and be a supportive dad until he finds out the bio-dad Josh is coming too. Josh doesn’t show up – he’s this season’s Norma – but Tara does not take kindly to Louis’s jealous fit and suggests they take a step back and get to know each other better before making big commitments like marriage and co-parenting of her baby. Louis takes her up on her suggestion and brings her a box of his childhood memorabilia to explain how he came to be the way he is.
  • Louis gets anxious about his appearance after seeing a picture (that we don’t see) of the apparently good-looking Josh, and goes to Harvey for advice on how to compete with that. Harvey demurs that he can’t speak for all handsome men (heh). And when Louis asks Harvey to say honestly what the first things are that he notices when he looks at Louis, we get the not bad line that is the episode title: Teeth, Nose, Teeth.

Next week: Watch out, Harvey and Mike, with your subverting of the law – I think Anita Gibbs might be lying in wait to trap you somewhere down that path.

KimMoritsuguTheHungryNovelist

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

Read Full Post »

In which Harvey and Mike enact completely separate story lines, we’re subjected to flashbacks shot with an ugly-making filter, a few characters (and artwork) from former seasons return, and new recurring ones are introduced.

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Flashbacks to 9 years ago indicate that Suits’s costume department is still committed to that fake looking bangs-hairpiece for Donna, and her habit of wearing beautiful expensive cocktail dresses to work is not new. In the past, Donna urges Harvey to attend his father’s funeral, where he acts like a sulky child who bears a huge grudge against his mother Lily because she cheated on his saintly dad, and once asked him to lie about the cheating. He holds this grudge even though the parents were divorced several years before the father died, and the mother is now in a committed relationship with Bobby, the guy she had an affair with.

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At the funeral, where the flashback filter makes everyone looks embalmed, a haggard-looking Lily makes a touching graveside speech – against Harvey’s wishes – about how important Harvey and his brother were to the dad, though he was on the road a lot, and she did the majority of the child-rearing. Even stone-faced Harvey is moved by this speech – only because of the dad part, mind you – but later, at the wake his brother Marcus encourages him to attend, he gets all pissy with Lover Bobby and acts like a dick to Lily, with the result that they do not speak for the next 9 years.

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In the present day, Donna shows up at Harvey’s condo to find out why he missed his flight to Boston to reconcile with his mother.  An almost alarmingly thin Harvey, dressed in casual clothes that don’t hide Gabriel Macht’s slight frame like his suits do, isn’t sure he’s ready to forgive Lily, but Donna pep talks him into going anyway.

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Harvey drops in on a much more vital-looking Lily at the school where she teaches art, and asks her to go for dinner at Marcus’s restaurant. She is happy to see him after all this time and agrees for the next night. On Marcus’s insistence, Harvey stays overnight at his house and bonds with him, his wife and children.

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At dinner, Harvey condescendingly announces that he’s ready to forgive Lily for her past transgressions. Lily says she is willing to forgive him too –  for treating her and Bobby like dirt at the funeral, for not accepting her many heartfelt apologies for her 25-year-old actions, and for cutting her out of his life lo these many years. This makes Harvey throw another fit, because he is a BIG BABY who thinks he is innocent of all charges. When he starts to storm out of the restaurant,  she says to go ahead and leave like he always does. Whereupon a lightbulb goes on over his head. Who’s the abandoner now?

Marcus takes Lily’s side when Harvey complains that she dared accuse him of wrongdoing, and tells him about the time a few years ago when his cancer came back and Lily and Bobby stepped in and helped him out like good family members do and Harvey didn’t, because he is not part of the family anymore.

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Harvey returns to the school the next day and finally apologizes for real to Lily, who does the same and they hug and agree to not hate each other anymore. He then asks her for the weirdly huge photo poster she has on her wall of the two of them (Harvey as a child) with shows the duck painting in the background he was forced to give to Elliot Stemple in S16, E2. He brings the poster back to New York, hangs it on his office wall, and he and Donna gaze on it as if it is their dearly beloved child.

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Mike, meanwhile, is taking a day off from his unsuccessful job search when Nathan of the Tall Guys’ Legal Aid Clinic drops by. Tall Nathan wants to hire Mike to work for the same salary as the office coffee fetcher – specified as being a paltry $35,000 per annum – to supervise the young lawyers and law students at the clinic. He knows all about Mike’s fraudulent past (they first met when Mike pretended to be a law student in his bike courier days) but Nathan figures that paying a smart ex-con with partner level lawyer experience peanuts to help poor people is nothing but a win.

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Mike happily takes the job and starts acting know-it-all-ish in a Harvey-esque manner with Tall Oliver, a young lawyer who likes him, and Medusa-haired Marissa, a law student who resists Mike’s sage advice and guidance because she thinks he’s a corporate fatcat and doesn’t know his back story, only Tall Nathan and Tall Oliver do. These youngsters are too busy fighting for the common man to have read up on Mike in the National Law Journal – they catch up on news via the Huffington Post (which, really?).

Mike calls a meeting of all staff in the clinic and hands out clippings about his storied past. Boom. He’s not hiding anything anymore. Except that when Marissa and Oliver are outfoxed in court by a slum landlord’s experienced lawyer, and it looks like the single mother tenant will be evicted, Mike drops off a cheque to the tenant to cover the rent owed. He claims it comes from the clinic’s emergency fund, but it comes from his personal account because he’s a do-gooder now who will also soon be poor. Just like he always dreamed! And Marissa and Tall Oliver are more willing to hear his advice and keep on fighting for justice for the downtrodden now that he was proven right by them losing. So those two get to recur for at least a few more episodes.

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Louis has very little to do this episode except handle, off-stage, with Rachel’s help, a problem/inquiry one of Harvey’s clients has while he is away. When Harvey returns from his family therapy trip full of peacemaking feelings, Louis also gets to accept an apology from him for Harvey’s harsh words about Louis’s abilities of the previous episode.

Together, they decide to become co-managing partners of the firm, and to leave the firm name as is, in case Jessica wants to return. (Which she may do soon, per imdb.)

Next week: Rachel may not get admitted to the bar, and Harvey has an idea for how Mike could be admitted that Mike doesn’t like.

KimMoritsuguTheHungryNovelist

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

Read Full Post »

In the mid-season/summer finale, Jessica leaves Pearson Specter Litt, and Gina Torres leaves the show! Also, Louis proposes to a pregnant Tara, and OMG, Harvey and Donna end the episode holding hands, in what seems like a platonic way.

Though do platonic friends often hold hands? Not really. Not unless they’re in a rom-com about two best friends who are actually in love but one or both of them hasn’t figured that out yet. So maybe Harvey and Donna shippers do have reason to rejoice. Maybe.

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Jessica has made Leonard Bailey’s appeal her #1 priority, because when she was an awkward teen with un-straightened hair and her workaholic doctor father never had time for his wife or daughter, she wanted to become a lawyer, and not the ‘power-hungry bottom-feeding’ kind, but the kind that helps people.

So when Robert Zane warns her that the company her number one client Jim Reynolds works for is shopping around for a new law firm, she makes Harvey and Louis handle that situation, because she has a death row case to fight, damn it.

In court, she slays Georgina, Bailey’s former defender. One for Jessica. She agrees to have Bailey testify about what happened the day of the murders, which is that he and his alibi witness, both of them high on meth, came upon a dying, bleeding girl on the street and he stayed with her until the police came and accused him of killing her and her already dead boyfriend.

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Jessica lets Rachel question Bailey before the jury and  he comes across as sympathetic. And when Mike and Rachel suggest that Jessica let the victim’s father incriminate himself on the stand (taking  a page from the movie A Few Good Men) – with regard to him paying off the alibi witness to go away and not testify before she conveniently died – she goes for it. The gamble works – Bailey is exonerated and released on the spot.

After a verdict like that, Jessica can’t even anymore with the PSL travails. She turns down Robert Zane’s offer to merge firms, as generous and kind-hearted as it is. She’s going to move to Chicago instead with old flame Jeff and fight injustice, an idea Jeff appears to be in full support of, though since when is hitching your limo to the wagon of some guy you went out with for a few months a year ago a good idea for a smart, powerful woman? Never mind. Jessica gets a bittersweet ending and an au revoir.

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When she breaks the news to Harvey and Louis, Louis freaks out but Donna, the Voice of Reason, points out that Gina Torres has been released from her contract because she can’t stand living in Toronto for half the year and is moving to Shondaland in L.A. instead, so there’s nothing the other principals can do except continue to endure Toronto life, and console themselves by instagramming idyllic photos of summer weekends spent at Patrick J. Adams’ family cottage in Muskoka.

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With Jessica preoccupied with the Bailey case, Harvey and Louis work as an uneasy team to save what’s left of the firm. When they hear clients are bailing because Sutter is spreading the word that Harvey ‘tanked’ his defence, Harvey goes to Sutter’s house and threatens to have it seized under the bankruptcy proceedings unless the rumours stop. To avoid losing number one client Jim Reynolds, Harvey and Louis enlist Trader Stu’s help one last time and get him to buy out a major portion of the company Reynolds works for, so they can keep Reynolds in charge and fight off the PSL-hating Board of Directors. Trader Stu and his suspenders are also leaving, though – his motley crew of traders was offered free use of Sutter’s former offices in the bankruptcy settlement. So, goodbye, Stu.

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There’s no goodbye for Louis & Tara, more like a hello baby, because Tara is pregnant, with her ex’s child, and Louis is fine with that, he doesn’t even need to sleep on it, not really, though these two know each other even less well than Jessica and Jeff. Never mind again – Louis proposes and Tara accepts, because they’re both crazy. And it looks like Carly Pope is staying with the show for a little longer.

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Speaking of weddings, Rachel and Mike do not discuss when theirs might happen, though Mike gives Rachel a picture of her being a boss in court, because she’s well on her way to big-time lawyer-dom, while Mike’s future is up in the air.

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When he and Harvey sit down in their open neck shirts to drink scotch and celebrate Mike’s release from jail, Harvey offers Mike a consultant job at the firm. Mike is grateful, but he doesn’t know if he wants that – he’ll think about it during the hiatus.

And did I mention that with Jessica gone, the office empty again, and the future not looking too bright, Harvey and Donna hold hands, gaze out the window together at the photo backdrop of New York at night and look hopeful? Yeah, I think I did.

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Suits will return in the winter of 2017 to finish the 6th season, and so will I.

KimMoritsuguTheHungryNovelist

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

Read Full Post »

In which deals are on and off and off and on, and I’m sorry to say that the plot reversals have come to feel more like time fillers than organic, inevitable outcomes of a well developed story.

jill in prison

The end result of the incessant back and forths on who will inform on whom is that Mike convinces Kevin’s wife Jill to testify against her father in exchange for full immunity. That’s after we learn that Jill only agreed to the insider trading scheme to begin with because she found out Sutter’s fund was a big Ponzi scheme and she hoped they could make some quick gains to square things with their investors. In other words, William Sutter is the worst, and Jill and Kevin are collateral damage to his horribleness. Also, Harvey played Jill a recording of Sutter saying it would be better for Jill to go to jail than for him to, and Donna approached Jill on the street, and redheads should stick together, and since Donna’s dad was also a criminal, her advice is to get out now.

j in pink

Harvey starts the episode with Jessica, in a fetching shade of pink and a very tight skirt, commanding him to win Sutter’s case (for the sake of the law firm) since Mike’s deal was called off anyway. Harvey gives Sutter’s defence a good go for a bit, blows off Cahill, and discredits a key prosecution witness in a deposition, but he ends the ep by persuading Sutter to plead guilty and make his own deal for a reduced sentence.

Mike and Kevin (or, as Gallo amusingly calls them, while channeling my mother –  Frick and Frack) start off this week by making up, but when Mike comes clean about informing on him, Kevin beats him up in the kitchen. Later, after Jill agrees to testify against her father, Mike and Kevin make up again. Since Mike cut a new deal with Cahill in exchange for delivering Jill, it looks like he’s going to get out of prison. It looks like it enough that he tells Rachel he’s coming home, and Donna and Rachel go out to celebrate his release. But he’s not out yet. Not with two more episodes still to come before the show goes on its mid-season hiatus. He’d better be out by then, though. Or I will be doing a lot of sad head shaking and disappointed finger wagging.

kev & mike make up

And what about Gallo, you ask? Gallo pressures Mike to pressure Harvey to get moving on that motion to have Gallo paroled. Harvey admits he hasn’t done anything about it yet because he thought that if Mike got out, Gallo should stay in. Mike urges Harvey to get to it, and convinces  Gallo to use his influence with the guards to get Kevin out of solitary after the kitchen fight. Gallo delivers but warns Mike that violent retribution will ensue,  inside or outside of jail, if Mike double crosses him. So we’ve got that to look forward to.

rachel & aunt

This episode was directed by Gabriel Macht, BTW, so I have him to thank for making my screengrabs easier to grab by occasionally using shots that show two characters facing each other in the same frame. Thank you, Gabriel!  Anyway, Rachel & Jessica tell Leonard Bailey his alibi witness is dead, but there is another way to delay his execution – if he can come up with, say, a relative who would attend the execution but can’t for 60 days because she’s not well. Amazingly, Bailey has such a relative! – the aunt who raised him but thinks he is guilty and has not seen or spoken to him in years. Rachel pays the woman a visit. The aunt has no intention of witnessing the execution, but when Rachel implores her to sign an affidavit saying she would like the execution to be delayed, she does.

When Bailey hears about this, he gets all pissed that Rachel didn’t make his aunt care about him, as if that’s more important than whether he lives or dies, and he accuses Jessica of being cold and heartless. Afterwards, Rachel tries to be sympathetic to Jessica, but Jessica is like, just go find some evidence to clear the SOB, will ya? And late at night in the law firm library, it looks like Rachel might have found something she can use in the case …

donna in full skirt dress

Louis confides in Donna, wearing a kicky full-skirted dress that is a flattering departure from her usual flattering dress styles, that he doesn’t know if he can be the Other Man with Tara. Donna mentions that she broke up with the never-seen-and-only-recently-talked-about Mitchell person she claims to have been dating because he wanted to move in with her, and she knew he wasn’t the One. But Tara does seem like the One for Louis, so he should keep trying. And why are all the Suits scenes lit so darkly, even daytime office scenes?

louis&tara

On a dinner date with Tara, Louis makes a scene with the maitre d’ that is all about Louis’s inability to share her with anyone. Tara is inexplicably charmed by this outburst, and they go home and have what Tara calls ‘magical’ sex, after which Director Gabriel treats us to this rather frightening if comical aerial shot of the lovebirds. Louis thinks his yeoman sex work means Tara will now break up with her other guy, whose name is Josh.  Except Tara is not ready to do that, and Josh is coming to town soon.

What do you think – will this Josh be way better looking and charming than Louis, and play on all his insecurities, or will he be Rick Hoffman, playing a dual role? That would be kind of funny, actually. Or maybe Josh could be Gabriel Macht playing a dual role. That would be even funnier.

jessica and jeff

While in court making a motion on Bailey’s case, Jessica runs into her old flame Jeff Malone. Jeff has softened somewhat since leaving the law firm and their relationship in a major huff. Jessica says she hasn’t called him because she’s still embroiled in all her law firm’s shit but she cares about him. They go for dinner, and Jeff says he loves her for herself, cold heartlessness and all. Awww. She invites him to spend the night, but he wants to go slow. That is, he’s looking for a job reference from her, because he’s moving to Chicago. She gives him a good one, and he leaves, though not for good, if I know this show.

Next week: Cahill tells Mike his deal to get out of prison is off (again). Sigh.

KimMoritsuguTheHungryNovelist

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper whose latest novel is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club.

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