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Archive for the ‘Suits Season 7 Recap’ Category

In which Mike lies and lies, Harvey has a secret, Donna wears a cleavage-y suit, and Louis represents Dr. Paula against her ex-boyfriend.

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Mike may or may not be working on a pro bono case to do with Brooklyn Housing, but he says he is when lying to Tall Nathan, Harvey, and Rachel about the class action prison lawsuit that he promised Harvey, in writing, he would not work on.

Despite Mike’s years of experience with lying, Tall Nathan and Rachel catch him out soon enough. Tall Nathan is fine with it, because this time Harvey is the one being screwed. Rachel is not fine, because she covered for Mike with Harvey, and now she’s starting to wonder what Mike’s word is worth. Like, we don’t even know if he set a wedding date with her last week like he promised he would, because priorities.

After tracking down more ex-cons who were framed into serving extended time, Mike and Tall Oliver realize this prison money-making scam is going on in a bunch of private prisons, which leads Mike to visit last season’s Mr. Evil, hardened convict Frank Gallo. (Groan with me now if you were hoping Gallo would not return this season, or ever.)

Gallo has seen it all, so sure, he knows that tough guy cons are sometimes paid to pick a fight with a prisoner about to be released. He’s done it himself in the past, though that was not why he attacked Mike at Danbury. Mike asks him to testify about what he knows in return for an early release, but he can’t trick Gallo twice – the last time Gallo was promised a release, he got an extended stay himself instead.

Tall Oliver suggests Mike find another reason Gallo might sing, and Mike discovers Gallo has a daughter (estranged) who could use a part of the millions that will be up for grabs if they win the class action suit. He invites Gallo to join the suit, and Gallo concedes that money is a good motivator for him to supply Mike with damning info, but not until he sees some of that money.

Harvey works on a case that involves Lockwood Energy and some other energy producing company. The details of it are boring, but Harvey faces a tight deadline (as usual) to prove that company A stole some technology from company B. When his meetings with the two CEO’s don’t get him anywhere, he asks Holly Cromwell to do some of her patented industrial spying, which may or may not involve sex, and how uncomfortable do those super-tight dresses she wears look? Holly takes on the assignment as an audition – she wants to leave her non-lucrative head-hunting job and be hired fulltime by PSL as a consultant.

Harvey, a terrible manager, is ready to hire Holly without thinking much about it, but COO Donna says not so fast and calls Holly in for an interview. Holly impresses Donna with her honesty,  and produces the needed intel for the Lockwood Energy case, but when Harvey later offers her a job, Holly has decided to be a freelance investigator/spy and turns it down.

Why do so many of my notes from this episode concern Louis? Because Harvey asks him to help Dr. Paula with a lawsuit brought by her ex-partner, which she does NOT want Harvey to get involved with or know the details of. Louis agrees to take on the case, and gives his word he will not tell Harvey anything about it, AND he will keep Harvey’s relationship with Dr. Paula secret from Donna.

The back story of the lawsuit goes like this: the ex (name of Jacob), also a psychiatrist, was cheating on Dr. P. When she found out, they split up both their business partnership and their relationship. Afterwards, he wanted to get back together but she didn’t. Some of Jacob’s psychiatric patients wanted to be treated by Dr. P. instead, so she took them on. Now Jacob is accusing her of stealing his clients in violation of their partnership dissolution agreement, and if she won’t pay a big settlement, he threatens to report her to the “Ethics Board” for dating a former patient before the official waiting period was up. (Sidenote: a quick Google search indicates there is no such thing as an official waiting period, and that the AMA frowns on almost all doctor-patient relationships. But feel free to correct me in the comments if you know differently.)

Louis manages the case well. He has a few angry outbursts with Jacob and his lawyer, and accuses Jacob of a) blackmail and b) acting out of revenge, but his outbursts are semi-appropriate, and he confesses to his own shrink that he feels sympathy for Jacob, the spurned man. After Louis finds out from Dr. P. that Jacob has been stalking her for months, he threatens to have Jacob charged with the crime, and the lawsuit is dropped. A contrite and tearful Jacob explains that he only sued and stalked because he was  heartbroken and disappointed to see that his dream of a family life with Dr. P. was over, and it was all his fault.

Louis’s shrink Dr. Lipshitz points out the parallels between Jacob’s and Louis’s situations (both fucked up their relationships and wanted to get back with the woman they love), and Louis acknowledges that he still needs to work on himself re: his breakup with Tara.

Harvey somehow finds out – not from Louis – that Jacob cheated on Dr. P.  He asks her why she didn’t tell him that, was it because of his known disdain for people who cheat? She says some guff in reply about how she was afraid she might seem unlovable to him if he knew she had been betrayed, which, what? He assures her she’s the opposite of unlovable and they kiss, though rather passionlessly.

Next week: Mike keeps on lying, and everyone wants him to drop the prison case.

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

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In which everyone’s pissed at Harvey; Jessica appears, again looking glamourous AFand Robert Zane returns.

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Storyline #1: Rachel & Mike’s long delayed wedding

Harvey once offered up his spiffy condo as a wedding venue for Mike & Rachel, so Rachel gets his keys and takes her dad over there to check it out. Robert is not into it, and Rachel is not too keen either. When Rachel says she and Mike have been too busy to really plan the wedding, Robert wonders aloud if they will have time to focus on their marriage if they ever do get married, what with them being so wedded to work.

Sure enough, Mike can’t make it to the appointment with the wedding planner in the rather impressive looking ballroom at Toronto’s Fairmont Royal York Hotel, standing in for the Plaza Hotel in NYC, and Rachel is an hour late because of work. Afterwards, she tells Mike she still wants the wedding at the Plaza someday, but not super soon because they are both too busy doing what they love – working. They do promise to set a date though.

Storyline #2: It’s Hate Harvey Week

Louis, mostly recovered from what seemed like a major mental breakdown last week, goes looking for Stephanie, the associate that Donna fired for insubordination. When he finds out she was fired, he yells at Donna that Harvey (whom he refers to as Lord God Almighty, in more of a rage-y way than a joking one) is driving the firm into the ground, and everyone is pissed at him. Donna promptly tells Harvey to get his head out of his ass and deal with how the PSL team is falling apart.

Harvey returns to Chicago so we can check out Jessica’s latest stunning white dress and jacket combo, and asks her for advice. She suggests he give Louis a new piece of business to keep him happy, and alludes to the time when she and Harvey overcame some spat they were having because they worked together to poach a client from Zane.  Like maybe what Harvey & co. need is a crisis to bring them together, she’s just saying.

Next thing you know, Alex’s old law firm, Bratton Gould, aggressively comes after PSL’s clients, by suing them or courting them. Harvey fights one lawsuit in court, with Mike’s help, which makes them refer lamely to themselves as Batman & Robin. Louis reassures another skittish client with Alex’s help, which leads to a friendly dinner at which Louis and Alex discover something they have in common other than cats is that they were previously overlooked by their law firms’ name partners.

Bratton Gould is five times the size of PSL though, and they are not giving up on their vendetta, apparently caused by PSL taking away Alex and his clients. Harvey asks Zane to pretend to be considering a merger with PSL, to make it look like they can fight off BG, but Zane won’t do it.

Donna is tasked with finding out who at PSL is giving BG all the juicy deets on which clients are vulnerable or stealable, and asks Rachel to confront the fired Stephanie, a likely suspect, and see if she’s the traitor. She isn’t, though (and the actress who plays her is very good at having perpetual bitchface).  It kills Donna that she has let Harvey down by failing to identify the leaker.

Alex finally admits that he has some (unspecified) dirt on Bratton, though he was involved in said dirt, so yeah, the sitch is awks. He goes to see the Bratton head guy (who may be Bratton himself), and they make a deal to never speak to each other again, for Alex to take all the blame if the dirty thing ever comes to light, and for BG to stop with the attack on PSL for 10 years.

Crisis averted, and fences apparently mended, Harvey figures out Jessica (!) was the person who fed inside info on the firm’s weaknesses to BG, though she clarifies that she only spilled the beans when they asked her to. And because she thought the best way to bring the PSL crew together was for them to be attacked. With friends like her …

Storyline #3: Mike’s Pro Bono Case is Still Going On

Last week, Mike promised Harvey – in writing – that he would stay out of the prison neglect case, and he handed it over to Tall Oliver.  This week, Tall Oliver asks Mike for advice without directly asking him, and Mike advises without seeming to advise. But when Tall O receives a large settlement offer from the prison company, Mike realizes they are onto something bigger than one prisoner’s death. He persuades the original client, Mr. Reyes (Reyos?), to turn down the settlement so that more claimants can be found, a bigger settlement sought and future deaths prevented.

Tall O finds more claimants, but he and the other tall guys at the legal aid clinic can’t handle all the work involved, they need Mike’s help. Mike hesitates because of the agreement. Come on now, Tall O asks, what’s a little lie between Harvey and Mike about this vital social justice case when Mike lied for years about being a lawyer? Mike soon caves: he’s back on the case, on the down low.

Random Notes:

  • Rachel and her dad have a mutually admiring conversation about how she liked the idea of working with him when the fake merger was being talked out, and he thinks she’s a great lawyer. Is Rachel’s possible departure for her dad’s law firm the beginning of an exit strategy for the Rachel character, now that the actors’ seven year contracts are coming to an end and Meghan Markle may be looking to move to the U.K.?
  • Looks like iterations of the ‘fuck’ word are here to stay in Suitsland: Alex referred to his former partner at Bratton Gould as a motherfucker (!)

Next week: Same as every week, Pinky – secrets and lies abound.

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

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In which besties Rachel and Donna shout mean things at each other but all is okay after they apologize (is that how friendships work?), Harvey and Mike lock horns about a pro bono case, Louis has a breakdown, and Mike gets case-blocked by new partner Alex.

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We open with Louis mudding, and we know this is a dream because a bare-chested Harvey is mudding next to him, which will never happen in the Suits’ version of real life, though I’d like to point out that this is the second consecutive episode in which we have seen Gabriel Macht’s chest and shoulders – so much for the show-no-skin clause I was sure he had in his contract. Alex also shows up in the mud room to taunt Louis, because this is actually a mudmare, though when informed by phone of the dream, Louis’s shrink Dr. Lipshitz suggests a more positive interpretation: Alex could become a new friend for Louis.

Louis tries too hard to befriend Alex, of course, though his welcome gift of a honeysuckle plant is appreciated, and Alex has two cats, so things are looking up until he cancels a lunch date with Louis to go to a meeting with Harvey.  Louis of course assumes that Alex canceled to be mean, and that Alex and Harvey are laughing at him. Dr. Lipshitz talks him down from the Seven Stages of Louis and into doing his breathing exercises.

At lunch with Harvey after their meeting, Alex asks what Louis’s deal is, and Harvey explains that Louis is like the Frank Burns character on the TV show MASH. This is a pretty tough reference to make for anyone under 40, but Alex gets it: Louis loves Harvey, hates him, and wants to be him, all at once.

When Louis later confronts Harvey about letting Alex’s concerns take precedence over Mike’s, Harvey meanly tells him off, and accuses Louis of jealousy, which sends Louis into mental breakdown mode. He calls Dr. Lipshitz, distraught, addresses him as Harvey, and pours out all his hurt, self-loathing, anger, and despair. Hard to know what direction the Louis character will take after that scene.

Must have been a slow week at the NYT, because the profile they ran of Mike looks like it took up major column inches, especially when blown up to poster size,  laid out with mocking captions, and posted on Mike’s office windows – all thanks to Harvey, and a bit of a dick move considering it was Harvey’s idea that Mike do some self-promotion to repair his reputation. Though Harvey says the display is all so he can make a joke about how Mike should wear black next time he’s photographed, because it’s more slimming.

Mike takes this ribbing with a smile, kind of like how Patrick J. Adams smiled when my son, a fellow (but younger) Northern Secondary School alum, disturbed PJA at the Wayhome music festival last weekend and asked to take a pic. “For my mom who writes Suits recaps,” my son said, to my mortification at a remove. Love the picture though!

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Back on Suits, Mike is supposed to be working on a corporate merger file for Harvey when he is approached by a Mr. Reyes, a man whose son died in a privately run prison, and who has sought out Mike after reading the NYT article. Mr. Reyes doesn’t believe the prison’s story – that his son, who was in for possession of one ounce of marijuana, got into a fight shortly before he was to be paroled, then died of a heart attack  – and wants Mike to find out what really happened, to prevent other convicts from dying needlessly.

Harvey gives Mike his blessing to take on Mr. Reyes’ case pro bono, and brings in Alex to work on the merger. But Mike’s digging into how the prison is run – on a bare bones budget that neglects prisoner safety – causes trouble at the law firm. It seems that one of Alex’s clients is a land developer who sometimes builds prisons, including the one where the son died. And Harvey does not want to piss off any of Alex’s clients.

Harvey tells Mike to drop the case or he can forget about doing any more pro bono cases.  Mike meets Tall Oliver down in Parkdale on Queen West, ribs him about his comic book buying habits (it’s better than being a corporate stooge, Tall Oliver retorts) and asks him to take over the case and file a lawsuit against the prison management company. Tall Oliver is skeptical at first, but agrees.

Harvey is not happy with Mike handing off the case to the clinic, and makes him sign a declaration saying he will have nothing further to do with the case. A testy Mike introduces himself to Alex, presents him with a list of the next 12-14 lawsuits he plans to file, and testily asks him to check now for any potential conflicts among them, because he never wants to bullied by a client again. Alex tells him he will check, and that he has just told his construction company client the same thing. Are they all good now? Not quite, but at least neither of them broke down.

Donna and Rachel have tense times too, as they try out their new roles as COO and Associates Supervisor, respectively. Rachel is pissed off when an upstart 4th year associate named Stephanie tries to bypass her instructions and shrug off assignments, but she doesn’t want to fire her. A second confrontation between them turns ugly and public when Stephanie implies that Rachel is not deserving of respect because she is less experienced. It gets uglier when Donna steps in and gives Stephanie total shit, making Rachel look ineffective and weak.

Rachel and Donna have a yelling match in the restroom about the bullpen incident. Rachel says Donna belittled her in front of the associates, Donna says Rachel is not ready to supervise staff. Later, they both apologize – Donna explains she isn’t that ready for her new job either, and besides, Harvey treated her like shit earlier. Rachel says she realized she doesn’t want to supervise the associates, she wants to be a lawyer. So Donna takes over the associates and promptly fires Stephanie.

Also: Harvey (who had a hella lot of screen time and character interactions this week) cooks a steak dinner for Dr. Paula. They are cozy with the wine and fire and all, but she has to wonder whether the two of them dating is a big mistake (IMO, she’s got that right!), ethically or otherwise. She’s scared their relationship will not work out, and she will feel and look like a fool, to herself and to others “Let’s be scared together,” Harvey says. Meh. I still think this won’t end well.

Next week: Alex’s old law firm comes after PSL.

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

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In which Harvey finds his footing as managing partner; Jessica appears in west Toronto subbing in for Chicago (hah!), looking glamourous AF in a fur stole; Mike goes up against an evil insurance company; and I remember why I dislike negotiation – because it’s all about posturing and lies!

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We open with Harvey lying in bed at dawn in his blinds-less bedroom with the oddly positioned bed. He watches Dr. Paula – wearing magically unsmudged eyeliner – sleeping beside him, in what is supposed to be a non-creepy, affectionate way, until she wakes. Pillow talk establishes they’ve had good sex, and they both want him to get to know her better, in a non-sexual way, but first they will have more sex. Harvey discreetly places the duvet between their meant-to-be-naked chests before they start making out again, which I’d like to think is a gentlemanly move made by Gabriel Macht toward Christina Cole, the actress who plays Dr. Paula, but may just be him following the director’s direction.

In a flashback scene, a younger Jessica explains to a younger Harvey that just like a dictator’s statue gets toppled when regimes change, outgoing partners should be supplanted and big clients fired when there’s a new sheriff in town (mixed metaphors hers).

In the present, Harvey interprets this flashback to mean he should ask his old lawyer pal Alex to join the firm and bring a big client with him (which sounded to me like it was Pfizer, the pharmaceutical giant, but maybe it was a company called Feizer?).

Sidenote: Alex is played by actor/tap dancer Dulé Hill, who is probably best known from his starring role on a USA network TV show called Psych. I’ve never seen Psych, but I recognized him from when I saw him on Broadway in 2013, singing and tap dancing in the musical After Midnight. My dive into his Wikipedia page   reminded me that I also saw him on B’way in Bring in ‘da Noise, Bring in da Funk in 1996. Because I’ve lived in Toronto all my life, but I’ve gone annually to New York to see Broadway musicals that feature tap dancing since forever.

Dulé still tap dances (see him tap on the Suits set here), so I like him already. Even if his nattily dressed character Alex initially tells Harvey he will come over to the firm only if he can become a name partner.

To begin with, Harvey tries to push this demand through, and ruffles the feathers of Louis, who is jealous that Alex will come in and take his place as Harvey’s friend/fellow name partner; Donna, who thinks Harvey should not drop Jim Reynolds, Jessica’s 1st client, whose products compete with Pfizer’s/Feizer’s; and Jessica in Chicago, who does not want to have her statue toppled just yet.

Long story short: everybody who talked tough and took take it or leave it stances ends up capitulating without much argument.  They didn’t really mean it, so here’s milk for his porringer and butter for his bread: Alex will come over as a regular partner, and bring Pfizer with him, Jessica’s statue will be toppled but her name will remain on the wall, and the never-seen client Jim Reynolds is toast (mixed metaphors mine).

Donna gives up her newly acquired senior partnership too, after Katrina – who is not yet a partner, let us remember – gently points out to Harvey that Donna’s promotion might signal to those inside and outside the firm that being a partner at PSL doesn’t mean much. And why did Donna agree to give up the partnership she fought for last week, in return for a new title of COO of the firm and a seat at the table? Because she never expected Harvey to agree to make her partner to begin with. Argh. People and their bogus demands and dishonest bargaining positions, I tell ya.

Mike spends the episode working on a pro bono case. He represents a guy whose wife died in a car accident, and whose claim on a life insurance policy was denied. The insurance company found an old social media photo of the wife holding a cigarette, which they say means she lied on her policy application when she said she didn’t smoke, which means the policy was invalidated, though the death had nothing to do with smoking.

Mike spars with the insurance company lawyer, an experienced but rumpled shark type, who quickly brings up Mike’s fraudulent past before the judge. Mike, worried that his history will prejudice the case, asks Rachel to take over for him. Harvey vetoes that plan  – he gave Mike, not Rachel, permission to alternate pro bono cases with paying ones. Harvey suggests Mike stop apologizing,  start intimidating, and start a PR campaign to repair his reputation while he’s at it.

Mike and Rachel hire Ms. Cromwell, the industrial spy who met Rachel in the same bar last season, to get some dirt on the insurance company. They pay her 50 grand (out of Mike’s pocket, presumably) for her trouble. She comes up with an incriminating internal email about insurance company policy that Mike leverages with the rumpled shark to get $15 million for his client, and either an admission of guilt or an agreement to be interviewed saying good things about Mike for the New York Times law pages, which, do those exist? Not sure about that.

Rumpleshark agrees to the settlement, and more reluctantly, to the interview for an article about Mike, to be titled, “Redemption of a Fraudulent Lawyer.” Really not sure about that as a NYT headline.

As for Louis, he has not yet heard from Tara since he left her a message asking to talk the week before. In some amusing scenes this week, however, we see that he’s in therapy, and has been for years, with a German-accented male therapist named Dr. Lipshitz. Dr. Lipshitz tells Louis not to make promises he can’t keep, not to let his emotions control his actions, and that his biological clock is not running out. He can father a child in his late 70’s like his idol Tony Randall! An obscure reference, but okay sure.

Louis also sells the funniest line of the night after he confesses to Harvey why he opposed Alex joining the firm. When Harvey promises that the Louis-Harvey friendship will endure, Louis tries to curry favour with a sports analogy he says he stayed up all night researching, to do with LeBron James, Dwayne Wade and Chris Bosch and the Miami Heat. We know Harvey’s truly ready to be managing partner when he graciously acknowledges Louis’ effort without correcting his mixup of basketball and football. Everybody say AWWW.

Next week: Alex causes friction at the firm.

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

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In which Harvey drives a Ferrari convertible around Toronto, Rachel wears new hair about which I have doubts, Louis acts like a jerk, and Donna’s search for ‘more’ in life is rather quickly resolved.

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I don’t get why either, but Mike being back in the firm makes Harvey decide to romance his former shrink Dr. Paula, so he drives up Toronto’s University Ave, past the Toronto General Hospital, to Lowther Avenue in the Annex/Yorkville neighbourhood, a location I identified by a) scouring Google maps’ streetview of Yorkville side streets, and b) riding over there on my bike to confirm the specific spot on the block, diligent recapper that I am.

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Harvey finds Dr. Paula walking on the street by her house when he pulls up, which does NOT happen in real life mild stalking, as I may know from personal experience, having maybe once walked very slowly by a modest house in Toronto’s west end where Suits was purportedly shooting one hot summer day last year (or was it the year before?), only to fail to see anyone of interest except a security guard and a crew member wearing a Suits T-shirt.

Harvey asks Dr. P out, and she brings up the ethics issue with regard to doctor-patient dating, but in a friendly, slightly flirtatious manner. He points out sufficient time has gone by since she last treated him, and she agrees to one dinner. And yes, he should definitely bring the car to their date, because in the Suits universe, a smart, accomplished woman who previously told Harvey she is not impressed by his wealth and sexual history is a woman who digs a dashing guy in a vintage expensive sports car.

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Back in law land, Mike gives Tall Nathan at the Tall Guys Legal Aid Clinic a cheque for $500K,  but oops, this means Mike is leaving to work fulltime for PSL after all. Tall Nathan sits down to make his height less noticeable and takes the money, but he and Tall Oliver won’t believe that Mike will alternate his fatcat corporate cases with pro bono ones until they see him doing it.

Fresh off showing his dick car to Dr. Paula, Harvey is all banter and jokes with Mike about bike racks and Jedis, and wants to  put on one last show case with him before he has to stop having fun and perform boring managing partner duties. The last case involves a vodka company run by a tough talker named Stillman (get it? vodka = a still + this guy is a man?). Stillman wants to sell his company and he wants it done quickly or he’s going to fire PSL, so here we go with another classic Suits fake tight deadline to propel the plot.

Harvey & Mike giddily plan a party featuring an open bar and models (of the fashion variety) for prospective vodka business buyers. Harvey goes to a modeling agency to hire the models (as if he wouldn’t just look at headshots or delegate this job to Donna) but all he can think about amidst all the beautiful faces and skinny young bodies is Dr. Paula, so he calls her, and phone flirts, which she is into.

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At dinner, Harvey makes the big date mistake of NOT LISTENING when Dr. Paula is filling him in on her background (a brother who teaches at Cambridge U is mentioned to underline that Paula is not a mindless pretty face. Unlike models.) In Harvey’s defence,  he has been under some work strain, but Dr. Paula is all, “This was a mistake,” and “Doctors and patients should never date, especially since I have been known to fantasize about being kissed manfully by you on my doorstep, you handsome devil. I was a fool to entertain that fantasy, but I’ll throw it out there now so you can pick up on it later in the episode.” And she stalks out of the restaurant.

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At the vodka buyers party, Harvey reveals that because he is an astute biz world observer, he knows that the serious bidders for the business will be the guys at the party who are not chatting up the models nor getting wasted on the free booze. Nice sexist and stupid thinking, boys. Meanwhile, Mike and Harvey get to drink, cuz woo-hoo! They’re bros in suits!

The next day they meet with two of the three serious bidders who have come forward and start a bidding war. Too bad Mike finds out soon after that Stillman wants to sell because he has been accused of stealing another company’s vodka recipe.

Harvey goes to confront Stillman about his deceptive ways, and is ordered to do his job and make the sale. But after a who-asked-you? pep talk from Mike about how Harvey is afraid – afraid! – to take responsibility and fill Jessica’s large shoes, Harvey goes back to Stillman (who has a weird habit of spending his work hours in the vodka plant that looks an awful lot like a brewery) and dictates a cockamamie plan to buy the competitor and market the identical formulas as separate brands or some such nonsense that will be a win for everyone except possibly vodka consumers.

The biggest story line this week is Donna’s. Early on in the ep, she buttonholes a distracted Harvey to say she has figured out what the formerly vague ‘more’ she wants from life is, and it’s to be a full partner at the firm (not a name partner though, let’s save that for next season). In a nice touch of sympathetic characterization, we see her cocky demeanour slip for a moment behind Harvey’s back, when she whews with relief after she makes her request and he doesn’t laugh her out of the building.

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Instead, he’s, like, “I’m busy booking models for a party, but I’ll take it under consideration.” He continues to dodge her on the topic even after she presents him with a cheque for 500 grand (Gretchen’s idea) to show she’s serious, and even when she punches above her weight class by dealing with Louis bullying the associates he claims to love except he’s a fucked up person who expresses his affection by being not just mean, but actionable-harrassment-type mean. And Donna deals with the Louis sitch despite Louis insulting her big-time and ranking her on the firm’s Ladder of Importance as far below Rachel, who is of course far below Louis.

By the 3rd or 4th time Donna asks Harvey about her partnership, after mentioning that BTW, other law firms have partners who aren’t lawyers, so it’d be no biggie if PSL did, he says okay, you got it.

That was quick.

At least one fan tweeted at series creator Aaron Korsh that Harvey’s capitulation was a sign of his poor management skills (sign #2 after the whole models party plan, if you ask me) but Mike thinks it’s about time, and I say sure, let’s go with it for Women Power reasons, and in the hope of fewer “because I’m Donna” scenes, and more interesting story lines for Sarah Rafferty, who seems like a lovely person from her Instagram feed. Really.

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Nowadays, it’s difficult to watch Meghan Markle as Rachel and see beyond the Prince Harry’s girlfriend filter. My “What’s happened to her hairline?” thoughts upon seeing her were quickly followed by wonderings on how soon she will leave the show, will she and Harry go public at the Invictus games in Toronto this fall, and could she possibly want to live the life of a royal, even a minor one, what with the tabloid scrutiny and the never-ending smile-and-be-gracious public appearances? Regardless, Rachel doesn’t have much to do this episode, aside from making weak she’s-a-good-sport jokes with Mike about how she is going to meet some Chippendale dancers (!) because the writers apparently could not come up with any guys who are more enticing and 21st century-ish that she could joke about meeting while Mike is partying with models. Guys like Nico Tortorella, Idris Elba,  John Cho, or Harry Styles, say.

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Rachel also gets yelled at by Louis when she suggests that maybe she should take over the associates, but in the end, thanks to new partner Donna, Rachel does take over the associates. Which should make for more interesting story lines for her this season than being a good sport about her fiancee’s partying. By the end of the episode, her hair even looked more becoming. Oh yeah, and she compassionately suggested to Louis that he speak to Tara, and get some closure on their breakup by voicemail.

To finish things off, Harvey caps off his good day as the firm’s official new managing partner by, you guessed it, driving back to Dr. Paula’s townhouse, taking her in his arms, and kissing her passionately. And what do you know, she too is tall.

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Bonus point: The word fuck is uttered (and promptly garbled/swallowed by someone in post-production) twice in this episode! Could it be that the glory days are ending of shit as the profanity of choice on this show?

Next week: Harvey and Dr. Paula have sex.

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

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