Suits Recap – S7 E13: Inevitable

In which Harvey and Mike banter to beat the band, as if (spoiler alert) their beautiful friendship is soon to be over; we say goodbye (and good riddance) to Paula; Harvey refuses to accept Donna’s resignation from the firm; and we welcome back Stu the trader, and Harvey’s mom.

Harvey, alone

Let’s start with the case of the week, because it’s neither very interesting nor very germane to the relationship drama/character building goings-on that keep this show alive.

A former client named Teddy walks unannounced into Harvey’s office, making us realize that the show writers have not bothered to give Harvey a new secretary to replace Donna. Jessica never had one either. I guess in the Suits universe managing partners don’t have dedicated support staff. Makes no sense, but okay.

A few years ago, this Teddy person sold his shoe company to Adidas, who have now sold it to a sharky guy named Baxter. Baxter has decided to move the manufacturing off-shore so he can make more money. Teddy wants Harvey to see if there’s a way to stop this happening for the employees’ sake. Harvey asks Mike to take care of it, giving Mike the opportunity to joke about them being Superman and Aquaman, versus their old Batman and Robin shtick.

donna nice dress

Mike comes up with another way to increase the company’s income that still protects jobs, but Baxter refuses it. Harvey and Mike decide the solution to Baxter’s dickishness is to short his stock. Donna, wearing a great dress that is, for once, office-appropriate, and has a bit of an Anna Karenina or maybe Doctor Zhivago vibe to it, asks her old buddy Stu the trader to do the stock manipulation. When he brings up the illegality and risk involved, she tells him he’s getting soft and needs to strut his gunslinger stuff again.

When the stock-shorting doesn’t have the desired effect, Teddy and Harvey come up with a new plan inspired by Donna’s new COO position at Specter Litt: they will give the shoe company employees an ownership stake, and they & Teddy will buy the company back from Baxter (yawn).

Meanwhile, in Harvey’s private life, he makes a dinner date with Paula so that they can remember why they like each other (how much fun does that date sound like?). When asked, he suggests she wear “the dress with the thing,” the thing apparently being a low-cut neckline that shows off her cleavage. Kind of like the necklines Donna wears to work every day, right Harvey? His mother, with whom I had forgotten he is reconciled, calls and cheerily suggests dinner on the same night. Paula doesn’t think she and Harvey are really at the meet-the-parents stage yet, but agrees to meet the mom. The dinner seems to go well. The mom tells a story about how Harvey the adorable child once stood on the piano and sang (we need to see the home video of this, please). Before leaving, the mom thanks Paula for being the special person in Harvey’s life who suggested he mend fences with her a few months ago, which comment leads to this reaction

awkward Paula reaction

because the special person who suggested that was Donna. After dinner, Paula tells Harvey she can’t handle being in a three-person relationship with an ex who is also his co-worker. Harvey, looking for a way out of this dicey sitch, asks Stu to offer Donna a job. Stu is happy to do it, because he thinks Donna is aces.

Donna does a good acting job (those theatre skills) when Stu offers to hire her, and says she’ll think about it. She then goes to Harvey. She knows he put Stu up to the job offer, and asks why he didn’t fire her if he wants to get rid of her, and why didn’t he stick up for her? He could never fire her, he says.

Donna visits Paula to apologize for the tragic kiss mistake and pleads for Paula’s support – as a woman and a professional –. for Donna to keep her job. Paula asks her to swear nothing like the kiss will ever happen again. When Donna hesitates, Paula sees where this is going – someone’s going to have to leave the show, and it won’t be a series regular and star who has renewed her contract for season 8.

Donna reads in voiceover a resignation letter that she leaves on Harvey’s desk after cleaning out her office. Harvey goes to Paula, says, “I wanted this to work more than you know, but I can’t give you what you need,” and breaks up with her. They both cry, Paula more so.

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Harvey makes a surprise drop-in at Donna’s apartment, where she is having a great hair evening in her classy lounge wear, as one does (not). He rips up her resignation letter, and asks her if she’ll come back – she will. He declines to come in. Not tonight, he says. Looks like Donna better decide soon if she has feelings for him or not.

On the Louis and Sheila front, we see no under-mud sex acts this week, thank god. Instead, they indulge in some role-playing games: she plays a burglar who breaks into his house, there’s talk of a prisoner and guard scenario, and also of a story line involving a director of admissions (her real job) and a janitor.

When Sheila’s upcoming wedding announcement is printed in the Times, Gretchen warns Louis that disaster will ensue if he keeps seeing her, but he tells Rachel (wearing a lovely, work-appropriate blouse), when she asks if he would like a plus-one for the wedding, that he has never felt so confident and king-like since embracing his bad boy side.

Rachel white blouse

That’s until he walks into Sheila’s office in costume as a nerdy professor (or something) and is introduced to Sheila’s fiance, Xander. Louis saves face (those theatre skills) and exits awkwardly, then overhears Xander mocking him, and Sheila going along with the mocking. Where’s confident King Louis now?

Like Harvey, Rachel also gets in some bantering time with Mike. Rachel and Mike’s conversations mainly concern a questionnaire on life plans that Father Walker has asked them each to complete, part of the pre-marriage counselling he’s giving them. Mike claims he’s not a planner (since when?) and can’t think that far ahead. Rachel introduces him to a game her parents used to play called Bullshit. The idea is to spitball crazy, half-formed hypothetical ideas at each other, without fear of censure.

Mike & Rachel playing Bullshit

So where would they be in the future if they could do whatever they wanted? Mike likes the idea of moving to San Diego, surfing every morning, and working 2 hours a day at a legal aid clinic that they would run together. Rachel suggests living for a year in Iceland, and having the adventure of a lifetime. Give the showrunner and writers credit – this conversation paves the way nicely for Mike and Rachel’s exit from the series, to happen at the end of the 3 hours that remain in this season.

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her seventh novel, coming in June 2018,  The Showrunner, is a darkly humourous, suspenseful Hollywood-noir novel about female ambition inside the TV biz. Check out its book trailer:

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Suits Recap – S7 E12: Bad Man

In which Louis gets the episode’s A story, complete with flashbacks to his teen years; Dr. Lipshitz and Tall Oliver return; and Jessica appears briefly, wearing what may be the most entertainingly ridiculous item of designer clothing that the show costumers have dressed her in yet.

mud job

Question: the sex talk between Sheila and Louis is supposed to be silly and stupid, and make them look foolish, right? Asking as someone who is embarrassed for the actors when they perform cringe-worthy scenes like the one where Sheila ambushes Louis at his mudding place, reaches under the mud, and seems to give him a hand-job. Yuck. Her reason for doing this: she wants to continue fucking Louis on the sly, though her wedding is a week away.

When Louis discusses the Sheila issue with his shrink Dr. Lipshitz, whom he now addresses as Stan, Stan asks what’s behind Louis’s pattern of falling for unavailable women. This question leads to flashbacks of Louis in 1986 in Scarsdale, when he was a burly, smiley teen who dated a girl named Mitzi, and his idea of a fun night out was to take her to a production of Uncle Vanya.

Mitzi only dates Louis because he’s a good guy her parents approve of, and she’s under the thrall of a bad boy who is Louis’s opposite.  Young Louis is devastated when he learns about Mitzi’s two-timing, courtesy of his younger but wiser sister Esther (remember beauteous Esther?).

In the present, Louis decides to sic a private detective, Holly Cromwell, and a gambler on Sheila’s fiance in order to discredit him, but Gretchen shuts down that plan, and suggests that if Louis loves and wants Sheila, he should tell her so.

Columbia Law School on Hoskin

Louis approaches Sheila outside Wycliffe College on the University of Toronto campus (subbing for Columbia Law School, which I bet looks rather unlike either Wycliffe or U of T’s Trinity College across the street, seen behind Louis) here:

Louis by Trinity College

He suggests they try to start over, but (like Paula) Sheila is not interested in having her heart broken again. She just wants a bad boy to have sex with.

wycliffe college

By the way, this whole doughy-loserish-guy-as-bad-boy thing reminds me of George’s bad boy episode on Seinfeld, and I think Seinfeld did it funnier. Anyway, Dr. Stan feels that Louis is not and never will be a bad boy, but Louis goes back to Wycliffe College at night, kisses Sheila right there out in the open, tells her they’re going to fuck in her office with the door unlocked, and declares himself a bad man. As if this will end well.

I like Gabriel Macht, but his slender build and Earth-father off-season social media persona make it difficult for me to suspend my disbelief any time Harvey boxes aggressively at his boxing gym, or threatens to beat people up while dressed in an expensive suit.  So picture me scoffing during this episode, when he does both. He also gets his own set of flashbacks, both to childhood (the actor playing him as a child is inexplicably dark-haired, why?) and to 10 years ago. The flashbacks are in service to Jessica’s request, after her name is removed from the wall (and dragged through the mud), for $2 million of her payout to be made to an untraceable bank account. She won’t say why. She does say that she’s not breaking the law or trying to evade taxes, and will declare the amount eventually.

Luckily, Harvey has for years been running an unpaid, off-the-books ‘side tab’  for Rick, a music publisher/record company mogul who owns the rights to Harvey’s dad’s semi-obscure jazz recordings. Harvey asks Rick to pay part (!) of his tab to Jessica’s untraceable account, but Rick can only pay if he sells his catalogue (worth millions, though not as many as formerly) to another company. And if he does that, Specter Senior’s music will no longer be played, not even once a year by a semi-obscure jazz radio station. Harvey struggles with this decision, but convinces Rick to sell. He also convinces the youngish buyer, whose New York office affords a great view of Toronto’s old and new city halls (located side by side downtown), to pay a price slightly higher than his first insulting offer.

Old and New City Hall

Harvey laments the loss of his dad’s music with a sympathetic Donna over an office drink, because they are friends, and always will be, even if Donna’s striking Dolce & Gabbana day dress is more suited to a garden party or wedding than to a routine day at a  law firm.

donna in dolce & gabbana

After the payment is made, Jessica calls in from Chicago to say that her pretty but crazy-ass-cut Monse top doesn’t work as office-wear either, but she doesn’t care. She tells Donna she knew all along about the side tab, of course. The implication being that getting Harvey to finally collect on it may be why she asked for the untraceable deposit. As a way to clean house post-exit, from afar.

Jessica in Monse

In case you wondered about Paula’s not-much-of-a-cliff-hanger reaction to Harvey’s confession from last week: it was that she needed some time alone to think about Harvey’s lying, Donna-kissing ways. Or she did until the end of this week’s episode, when Harvey comes over and says he likes Donna being a part of his life and sharing in his victories and defeats, but he still wants to be with Paula. Paula admits she feels threatened by Donna, and they (P&H) make up. Bets on whether their relationship lasts into season 8 with Katharine Heigl coming on board as a series regular?

Mike and Rachel show no sign this week of getting their wedding underway, despite their pledge to do so last time. They do, however, cook and prepare to consume more pasta, the official food of their couplehood. They also spend time with Tall Oliver, who approaches Mike about a deal between a local food bank that Tall Oliver represents and a Specter Litt client that has jacked up the price of products it was selling to the food bank at cost.

Tall Oliver is Mike’s friend, and his fight-for-the-little-guy motives are good, but Mike has to fight for his own client. Even Rachel encourages Mike not to go easy on T.O. After some verbal sparring, legal ass-kicking and back-and-forthing between the lawyers and their clients, Mike wins the case in his client’s favour and tells T.O. he shit the bed, just like Harvey would have told Mike. Afterwards, tall Oliver drops in at Mike’s apartment to thank him for treating him like an equal (this is how male friendship works in the Suits universe, go figure), and calls Mike a motherfucker, but in a friendly way. Then he, Mike and Rachel sit down to some linguine with pesto, because pasta rules.

Tall Oliver Kitchen.png

The purpose of the case seemed to be to show that Mike is adopting Harvey’s tough love tactics and behaving more like an asshole senior partner, but when Harvey offers him the position, Mike declines, saying he wants to spend more time with Rachel before they both quit the series. Only four more eps remain!

Next week: Conflict between Harvey & Donna and between Mike & Rachel. But will there be pasta?

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners, The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in June 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful Hollywood-noir novel about female ambition inside the TV biz. Check out its book trailer:

Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 11: Hard Truths

Rachel + MikeHere we go, finally, starting off the back six episodes of season 7, AKA the last TV episodes of Meghan Markle’s acting career. This is also the beginning of Patrick J. Adams’s home stretch for the show, but what proportion of viewers tuning into Suits these days are here to scrutinize Meghan? Seems like that many to me, too.

Hell, Vulture, a site that has shown little interest in Suits before, is even keeping a running summary on Meghan’s remaining scenes in Suits, with gifs. IMO, Meghan’s new international fame is why USA Network decided to delay airing the back six, originally scheduled for January, till now, so that Meghan’s Suits wedding at the end of April would lead up nicely to her real-life May wedding date.

Meghan scrutiny aside, this episode is mainly about the Kiss (treated as SUCH a big deal) that Donna planted on Harvey in S7 E10. You know, this one:

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We open immediately post-kiss. Harvey is rattled/flustered/thrown for a loop. He won’t talk to Louis about the pressing problem that is Jessica’s disbarment as arranged by lawyer nemesis Malik, and goes home, presumably to put on a cardigan, drink, and stare into a fire while reliving the passion that coursed through him when Donna’s lips touched his. But, surprise, Paula is at his place, having used the key he gave her. Rather than tell her what happened, he asks her to move in, ostensibly because she makes him feel like the outside world – replete with attack kissers and attack lawyers – doesn’t matter. She declines his offer, though, because she fears heartbreak, and possibly because her shrink sense is tingling about the timing of Harvey’s suggestion.

The next morning, Harvey storms into Donna’s office, says he does NOT want to talk about the kiss, and angrily asks her to promise it won’t happen again. She’s like, okay fine, whatever, because she felt NOTHING. Moving on to business matters, she suggests the firm hire a new senior partner, but he shits all over that idea because she’s not a lawyer, and he doesn’t trust her judgement anymore. Louis agrees that Donna should go ahead and bring in for a meeting some hotshot senior partner prospect who’s in town, but Harvey, in full asshole mode, sabotages the interview to spite and embarrass Donna.

donna + harvey

Donna, wearing a too shiny for work satin cocktail dress, confronts Harvey in the Bay Adelaide Centre lobby and they discuss the kiss. She confirms she doesn’t want more from their relationship, since she felt NOTHING. He is still pissed because a) he did feel something, and b) now he’s lied (by omission) to Paula and it’s all Donna’s fault. Funnily enough, Paula doesn’t agree when he does confess, two days after the fact, to the kiss having happened. She’s only mad at Harvey for the lying.

On Louis’s advice, Donna apologizes to Harvey. She is sad he thinks he can’t trust her judgment on work matters, but hey, what about all the flirting and work spouse bestie confidences they’ve engaged in over the years? She’s not the only one who has acted inappropriately.  Harvey eventually comes around and tells her he appreciates the times Donna put him first. He also takes her advice when she says she doesn’t think it would be a good idea to make Mike a senior partner, as Alex had suggested. And they hug.

Harvey + Donna Hugging

Alex gives Mike a juicy case to work on, partly to thank him for helping rescue Alex  from the thorny Reform Corp sitch earlier in the season, partly to help Mike advance in the firm, and partly on Harvey’s urging. The case is a dispute between Alex’s client, a Fortune 500 company called Quality Foods, and one of their distributors, Arctic, who transport food in refrigerated trucks.

The purpose of the case seems to be to give Mike and Rachel something to do, or not do, together. Mike asks Rachel for help with it, she says no, she’s too busy. He thinks there’s something scammy going on with it, she thinks he looks at all corporations through evil-tinted glasses now. Despite being busy, she does some research into the case, and finds out there is a scam going on. By way of explaining what she thinks Arctic is up to,  she asks Mike to recite their freezer contents by memory, and he reveals that the freezer contains pizza, ice cream, pasta sauce, and leftover lasagna made by Rachel. (Also vodka). Wait a minute – are we supposed to believe someone with Rachel’s ultra-slim build is eating that kind of carby and dairy-heavy diet? I don’t think so.

After they ‘win’ the case for the client, Mike gives Rachel credit publicly and privately for figuring shit out, and tells her they should work together more often, cuz it’s fun and otherwise they don’t see each other much. She suggests that instead, they work on getting their wedding underway in time for the season finale. He agrees.

On the Jessica disbarment front, Harvey & Louis try to find a way to remove Jessica’s name from the firm gracefully, and to give her the pay-out she deserves for her ownership stake at the same time. Louis tries to strong-arm the Ethics Committee guy into stalling the announcement of Jessica’s disbarment, but only gets a few days reprieve.

Harvey at Harbourfront

Harvey goes down to Toronto’s Harbourfront neighbourhood to see Stanley Gordon, a former name partner of the firm who we’ve met before (don’t ask me when or why) and who apparently takes meetings on his yacht in Toronto harbour. Sidenote: does anyone have an idea what New York-adjacent location the pier is supposed to represent, or should we just all now accept that Pearson Specter Litt is a New York law firm that has its head office in downtown Toronto?

Harvey wants to restructure the partnership agreement so Jessica can get paid, and he needs Gordon’s permission to do so. Gordon was ousted by Jessica once upon a time, so he’s in no mood to comply unless Harvey fixes some problem he has with a charity that took $10 million from him in exchange for naming rights on a new building, and did not make good on the naming.

Harvey meets the charity woman, accuses her (with reason) of doing money laundering, and gets her to agree to the naming, but Gordon still isn’t happy. Louis points out that all Gordon really wants is to disgrace Jessica. If she’s to get money, she also needs to be publicly shamed for the Mike as fraud lawyer thing, though Harvey, Louis and Mike were all also to blame. Especially Harvey, who hates the idea of blaming Jessica, but is convinced by Louis that there is no other way out.

An off-camera Jessica agrees to the hard truths of being named “selfish, unethical and reckless” in a press release from the firm, signed by Harvey and Louis, announcing that a “disgraceful chapter of the firm’s history is coming to a close.”

Harvey gets to deliver his own hard truth when he admits Paula that he once, years ago, slept with Donna, another lie by omission he has perpetuated. Her reaction to this confession? Tune in next week to find out.

Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners, The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in June 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful Hollywood-noir novel about female ambition inside the TV biz. Check out its book trailer:

Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 10: Donna

In which Andy Malik goes after Harvey by discrediting Donna; Robert Zane attempts to right a past wrong, with Rachel’s help; Louis helps Alex fight against his former law firm; Mike doesn’t do much, and oh yeah, this happens:

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We open with Harvey at home, trying on and discarding ties, on the day Donna is to appear in court, subpoenaed by Malik. Dr. Paula interprets Harvey’s somewhat nervous behaviour as a sign of his great loyalty to his work fam, as opposed to any sublimated feelings he has for Donna, say. Way to self-delude, Dr. P.

At the office, Louis declares there is no need for him to eviscerate Donna in a mock trial because Malik will raise the Danner case from years ago, and what happened is privileged “work product” so Donna won’t have to testify. He’s proven wrong when Malik brings up the Coastal Motors case instead, the one where Donna destroyed a file, which Malik says means she probably also destroyed the memo that never existed in the current Wall St. case.

Malik puts Donna through the wringer on the stand, and implies that she slept her way to her COO position at PSL. Afterwards, Donna lashes out at Louis, and says he’s to blame because he didn’t help her prepare for court. Donna figures out that Holly Cromwell is involved with the leaking of the fake memo to a Times reporter. She finds Holly, apologizes for PSL’s past treatment of her, and asks her to testify. Holly won’t do that, but knowing that she was involved gives the team the leverage they need to scare Malik off the case.  Still intent on bringing Harvey low, Malik announces he’s going after Jessica next, and will get her disbarred for her part in the Mike Ross-was-a-fraud-lawyer situation.

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Jessica shows up in a gorgeous powder blue coat to remind us how much we miss seeing her statuesque form garbed in beautiful expensive clothing. She’s cool with being disbarred – who needs New York to lawyer in, when she’s got Chicago? – and with taking her name off the firm’s wall, because it’s time for the firm to be Harvey’s. Time for Louis and Harvey to buy her out.

Zane père-et-fille are still fighting this Arthur Kittredge bank CEO guy, who years ago harassed Robert’s sister into quitting her job and going into decline before she died of cancer. Flashbacks show the sister to have been strong and smart, and Robert to have been afraid to help her for fear of risking his law career. In the present, Rachel and Robert try to establish that Kittredge had a pattern of discriminating (against women). Robert’s personal grudge and hot temper keep getting in the way of legally taking Kittredge down, but in the end, Rachel negotiates a deal with the bank’s Board that includes a settlement for the loan applicants who were discriminated against, and Kittredge’s resignation.

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Remember how Alex used to work for the evil, vindictive firm of Bratton Gould? Team PSL forced Bratton to resign, and now Gould is coming after Pfizer, the client Alex took with him when he left. Louis helps Alex by directing all the associates to work on his case. He also asks Dr. Lipshitz to impersonate a German pharmaceutical company head and make a fake phone call to head Gould off, but Dr. L declines, for obvious ethical reasons. Louis’s final ploy is to lend Alex his Dictaphone. Alex uses it to secretly tape Gould saying he is only going after Pfizer to punish Alex, which is illegal. The Dictaphone strikes again!

Louis also consults with Dr. Lipshitz about how upset he was when Donna blamed him for letting her go to court unprepared. After Dr. L points out the parallels with Louis’s Sheila situation, Louis apologizes to Donna. He explains that he didn’t want to question her about her feelings for Harvey because he wouldn’t want anyone to ask him about his for Sheila. Mike has earlier counselled Donna to make her feelings for Harvey known, so when Louis says he regrets not having told Sheila he loved her when he had the chance, Donna has a come-to-Donna moment. She kisses Harvey, delighting Darvey shippers the world over, and says, “I just had to know.”

Series creator Aaron Korsh said in a Deadline.com interview  – that also hints at what’s to come when Suits returns in 2018 – that Donna wanted to know how the kiss made her feel, not how Harvey would respond (which he mostly, but not totally, didn’t). We  are left hanging, in suitable summer finale fashion, as to what they each thought or felt.

ICYMI, some off-camera (let’s face it, gossip) notes about two cast members:

  • The news broke in late September that Gina Torres and her husband, actor Laurence Fishburne, have separated, which helps explain why she left Suits last season to return to LA from Toronto. She is now set to return to The Six to shoot her Chicago-set Suits spinoff.
  • Also in late September, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry did make their public debut as a couple at the Invictus Games in Toronto, as was keenly anticipated by royals watchers. For an interesting analysis of the meaning and import of Meghan’s recent Vanity Fair profile, check out the always entertaining Fug Girls’ take on it here.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz. Here’s a trailer for it:

Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 9: Shame

In which Louis hallucinates and babysits (not at the same time, luckily), Harvey goes up against the new Deputy Attorney General in town, and Robert and Rachel Zane work together on a pro bono case.

7211180885db4096ffeef3a954baIt’s the penultimate episode before Suits goes on hiatus, and everyone talks fast so they can get the new story lines underway before the break. Starting with Mike, who tells Harvey a new Deputy Attorney-General has announced he’s going to clean up Wall Street, and wouldn’t it be a kick for Harvey to lock horns with the guy? They quickly sign up as a client a woman investment banker whose firm is being investigated for evading taxes (or something), just so they can defend her against the crusading DAG.  Not sure why that would be fun, but hey, conflict!

Turns out Harvey knows the DAG, a guy named Andy Malik (played by actor Usman Ally,  as seen on Veep), from when they both worked in the DA’s office. Harvey, in his arrogant way, doesn’t remember Andy, but Donna does – as sneaky and conniving. She warns Harvey and Mike not to fuck with him, but they do anyway, and damn if he doesn’t come up with a new sneaky tactic every time they think they’ve outwitted him. By episode’s end, he has threatened to expose shady, Cameron Dennis-related doings that Harvey and Donna were involved with back in the day. This means that Donna may be called on to testify, which means it’s time for another mock trial so Donna can practice not falling apart on the stand. Harvey & Donna ask Louis to conduct the mock trial again, because he proved how incisive (read: cutthroat) he was during the last mock trial, when he got Donna to admit she was in love in Harvey. Donna swears she can take Louis’s hectoring this time.

Louis doesn’t agree to conduct the mock trial at first, because his mental breakdown is proceeding apace, his latest trigger being the the night he spent with Sheila Szaz in the Hotel of Immoral Assignations. During his unshaven walk of shame into the office the morning after, he hallucinates that he is being loudly shamed by more extras than the show has ever assembled on-set – are we supposed to think PSL employs this many people now? He cancels a session with Dr. Lipshitz, and urges Brian to get aggressive with a case involving patent infringement between two pacifier manufacturers. He also a) hallucinates that the CEO of the opposing pacifier company is Sheila’s fiancé and is berating him for sleeping with her, and b) is verbally abusive to Brian after Brian makes a mistake in the wording of a document.

Louis then has a big shouty argument with Gretchen, who won’t back off, because her job is to watch his back, but she promises to knock him the hell out if he treats another associate the way he’s treated Brian.

Gretchen sternly tells Brian to man up, not resign, and to clean up his mess, which he does by finding a solution for the case. A contrite Louis apologizes to Brian, has a session with Dr. Lipshitz, and tells him he is unraveling because he thinks Sheila is the one and he pushed her away and now has nothing. Dr. L would prefer Louis forget about his lost loves right now and work on the lashing out problem. Still contrite, Louis goes to Brian’s apartment and offers to hold the baby for a few hours so Brian can sleep. Brian is so sleep-deprived that he accepts the offer.

Robert Zane asks Rachel to work on a pro bono case with him –  a discrimination suit against a bank that he believes practices predatory lending against people of colour. They work well together and seem to be bonding. But when they depose a black loan officer who insists there is no discrimination at the bank, Robert loses it and calls the bank’s attorney a fool.  Rachel asks Robert what’s really going on, and he admits that he wants to take down the bank’s CEO because many years ago the CEO (then a bank branch manager) harassed and fired Robert’s late sister, and ruined her life. And get this: Robert was inspired by Mike’s commitment to social justice causes to go after this old enemy. Double Aww. And they’re not giving up on the case yet!

At first Donna won’t tell Rachel how her ‘date’ with Mark at the Hotel of Immoral Assignations went, or rather, did not go. When she’s had a few days to get over feeling like shit for even going over there, she tells Rachel the whole sordid story, with this punch line: she doesn’t regret putting Harvey over Mark in the days when she and Mark were dating. She regrets putting Harvey over herself.

Next week: On the summer season finale, Mike advises Donna to tell Harvey how she feels about him.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 8: 100

Patrick J. Adams directs the series’ much-promoted 100th episode, in which a fierce Robert Zane throws Harvey, none too gently, against a wall; Louis’s comedy bits make me laugh; and the writers upend my expectations (Frank Gallo dies! the prison case wraps up with 2 episodes left to go in this part of the season!) to pleasing effect.

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Let’s start with Donna’s hey-how-are-you call to her ex, AKA is calling an ex ever a good idea? Mark may be a (past) giver of leather-bound Shakespeare sonnet books, but he is also currently (and unhappily) married, a detail he neglects to mention till he and Donna are well into a cozy restaurant lunch. After that revelation, Donna tells him not to contact her until he’s single. Instead, he calls to say he’ll soon be in the city (from Connecticut), at the Carlyle Hotel (really Toronto’s Fairmont Royal York, unless the glass doors at the Carlyle are embossed with RY logos), for a conference, maybe she can drop by.

Donna has no intention of taking Mark up on his skeezy invitation, that is until she has a hella awkward run-in with Dr. Paula at the office. Dr. P has dropped in to leave Harvey a note or maybe a gift in honour of their 2 month anniversary.  I’ll praise Director Patrick J. and Sarah Rafferty for the relatable cutaways (pretending I know film direction terms now) during this scene, wherein Donna makes cringey faces to herself during the fakely bright and friendly convo that ensues, a conversation that Dr. P. sees through immediately because she’s a psychiatrist, yo.

The combo of Mark making caddish advances and Harvey being happy in his new relationship makes Donna sad. She refuses Rachel’s invitation to go for drinks, gets gussied up, and heads to the Hotel of Immoral Assignations. Luckily, her better instincts  – and a sweet text from Rachel, saying that Donna deserves the best – prevail, and she does not enter Mark’s room.

On to Louis: he flies off the handle because Gretchen requested that various Ivy League law schools send over resumes of new grad candidates to fill Stephanie’s now-vacant position (never mind that Stephanie was a 4th-year associate) and Columbia did not send any, damn it. After a decent comic bit featuring Louis’s ability to tell how many file folders he is holding from flipping through the stack and listening to the sound they make, he storms over to Columbia to complain. There, he discovers that his ex Sheila, who would not leave Harvard for him, now lives in New York, is engaged, and works at Columbia. She didn’t send any applicants for the job because she didn’t want to Louis to be hurt when he found out how much she has moved on.

Back at the office, Louis is sad that two loves of his life have rejected him in one year, and refuses to take Sheila’s calls. She eventually gets through and says she wants to use his body once more before she gets married in two weeks. Their phone conversation about what she would like to do with him sexually is funny because it contains so many incomplete sentences. And because their sex talk is ridiculous.

Sheila has booked ‘their’ special hotel room, also in the Royal York, and invites Louis to come over. He tells Rachel he is tempted to do something wrong without specifying what, and Rachel tells him she knows he has a good heart, no matter what happens.  Poor Louis goes and does ridiculous sex things with Sheila anyway.

The prison case: Harvey, Mike and Alex make a plan to take down Reform Corp and Masterson Construction and to save Alex from his evil overlords at the same time. Phase 1 of the plan is for Harvey to hand over the class action suit to Robert Zane, who has no client conflicts in the game, and whose role in the strained Batman and Robin analogy the show keeps pushing is apparently that of Commissioner Gordon.

Zane gets fired up about the case, because of the injustice and oppression it represents for mainly black prisoners. He asks for a huge settlement from Reform Corp (still repped by Harvey) and when that’s turned down, wants Frank Gallo to testify (like Mike wanted before). The PSL boys don’t want that though, because Alex will be ruined if the prison conspiracy comes to light. Rachel, of all people, finds a way to discredit her dad and Frank Gallo in court, by bringing up the photos of her that he took from Mike’s phone in prison back in the day, and passed around to the other inmates. After roughing up Harvey in a men’s restroom for that trick, Zane video-interviews Gallo anyway, and gets incriminating testimony from him about the Reform Corp CEO, a very bad guy named Shapiro.

All conflicts resolve when the gang learns that Gallo has been killed in jail (by Shapiro’s henchmen). Using Gallo’s pre-death taped interview – now admissible in court as a death-bed confession – as a weapon, they get Shapiro to sign a confession of conspiracy to fraud, and to agree to the original large settlement of the class action suit. They also convince very bad lawyer Bratton to resign from his firm, and to tear up Alex’s affidavit, the one that has him falsely taking responsibility for the prison-related wrong-doing. And no one is going is prison!

Alex no longer has a black cloud hanging over him, and tells Harvey they’re square, though Harvey thinks Alex owes him now. Mike apologizes to Zane for opposing him in court. He also delivers a generous cheque to Gallo’s daughter, and tells him Gallo was a decent man (you know, for a murderer/psychopath).

Now Harvey and Dr. Paula can go out for their romantic 2 month anniversary dinner! She gives him a small wrapped gift that he does not open, and he gives her the key to his apartment (the one Donna returned to him last week) in exchange. She is not fooled, she knows he didn’t know about the anniversary and had not prepared a gift. She still likes/loves him, though.

Next week: banter, jokes, and, I hope, a break from prisons.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.

Suits Recap – Season 7, Episode 7: Full Disclosure

In which we find out Alex’s secret and it’s a doozy, Anita Gibbs and her expensive-looking wig make a return appearance, we get an origin story on Louis and his shrink, and the flashback filter makes everyone look vampirish and sickly, except maybe Donna in her fake bangs.

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We start with Mike telling Rachel he plans to take the prison case to criminal court because he can’t let it go, and doing that would not be a violation of his agreement with Harvey. She is fine with his decision as long as she doesn’t have to lie to Harvey about it.

Mike tries to give the file to his old nemesis Anita Gibbs. And I have to say here that the way that Mike has faced down his biggest enemies, Gibbs and Frank Gallo, and asked them to work with him on the case, is either a measure of his brave and bold resolve, or is just crazy. Also possibly GoT-ish, from what I know of the show, to make alliances with people you despise in order to fight a big foe.

Anita will only pursue the case for the Dept of Justice if Mike can bring her proof of conspiracy between the two corporations involved, and that proof has to be from the company PSL does not represent because of attorney-client privilege.

Mike gets the proof he needs by asking Benjamin, the PSL IT guy, to do some illegal hacking of the company that isn’t their client, Reform Corp (shades of Mr. Robot‘s Evil Corp or what). But Harvey catches wind of Mike’s plan, and quickly signs up Reform Corp as a client, so it too will be protected.

And why does Harvey do this? Because he owes Alex big-time, thanks to what went down several years ago, pre-Mike, in the days when Harvey and Louis were associates and the Hardman in Pearson Hardman was running the firm. Back then, Louis gets a partnership ahead of Harvey, and Harvey is pissed. But the first time his lawyer pal Alex, an associate at Bratton Gould, floats the idea that they offer BG  a deal to take the two of them on as junior partners for the price of another more senior solo lawyer, Harvey says no, the deal doesn’t sound good enough for him.

Past Jessica makes past Harvey work on a case with past Louis. Louis lords it over Harvey, and when Harvey complains, Jessica tells him to stop whining and suck it up. Sort of like how she has had to rise above sexism, racism, and arrogant bossmen on her way to becoming name partner.

After Jessica puts him in his place, Harvey is humiliated and angry. He tells Alex to go ahead and make BG that 2-for-1 offer and gives his word he’ll take the job if his rock star rider type requirements are met. Bratton agrees to the terms but warns Alex he will be in deep shit if Harvey does not accept.

No surprise, Harvey changes his mind – mainly because Jessica told him he was the best lawyer in the firm, she wants him to be her work husband, and she has made Hardman promise Harvey is next up for a partnership. Alex is screwed, but he accepts Harvey’s decision graciously. And now Harvey owes Alex a big favour.

What was unknown to Harvey until the present was that after Alex’s play backfired, he was treated like shit by BG for years, until the day he was asked to take on a new client, Masterson Construction. Masterson partnered with Reform Corp and together they illegally and secretly used prisoners to build prisons. Alex didn’t know how criminal the two firms were being until a prison guard – who had told Alex that an inmate died during construction – was killed. Alex tried to extricate himself from the whole mess because murder! – and discovered that Bratton and Masterson Constr. had fixed the books so that Alex was complicit in every underhanded move they made. Rather than blow the whistle and end up in jail, which would leave his daughter fatherless (this guy has a family and personal life?), Alex stayed quiet at BG, his secret festering for years, until Harvey came along and offered him a partnership at PSL.

Remember a few weeks ago when BG was coming after PSL’s clients, and Alex signed a paper that made BG stop doing that? That paper said Alex was responsible for everything bad that ever happened with the prison building scheme. Now we know why he was so eager to stop Mike’s class action suit.

Alex starts the episode confessing all to Harvey, and ends it confessing all to Mike, against Harvey’s orders. Good thing too, because now Harvey can stop threatening to fire Mike for persisting with the case and they can all try to take down Masterson Construction and Reform Corp together before everyone’s futures are threatened. Especially since the boss of Masterson turned down a big cheque Harvey offered him to no longer be their client. He’d rather have them in his clutches, bwah-ha-ha.

Still in the past, Jessica commands Louis to go into therapy. Louis calls Dr. Lipshitz a Nazi upon hearing his German accent, but thaws a little when he learns Dr. L is a German Jew. He thaws further upon learning that Dr. L is excited to work with him, given that Louis is transparently screwed up and given to revelatory outbursts about his psyche. When Jessica hears that Louis is working on himself, she gives him responsibility for the associates for the first time, which doesn’t make much sense but okay, sure.

Also in the past, Donna and her bangs give Harvey grief about not consulting her when he was thinking about the two of them jumping ship for Bratton Gould. And she has a six month anniversary dinner with ‘Mark,’ a guy she’s dating who is thoughtful enough to give her a copy of Shakespeare’s sonnets as an anniversary gift. Too bad he breaks up with her on the spot because he’s sick of hearing her talk non-stop about Harvey.

Next week: In the series’s 100th episode, Rachel joins Team Prison Case, and we get the return of (the) Mark.


Kim Moritsugu is a Toronto novelist and sometime TV show recapper. Her most recent book is a suburban comedy of manners called The Oakdale Dinner Club. Coming in 2018: The Showrunner, a darkly humourous, suspenseful novel about female ambition inside the TV biz.